Manhattan

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Manhattan

(mănhăt`ən), indigenous people of North America of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). They were a small tribe of the Wappinger Confederacy. The Manhattan in the early 17th cent. inhabited N Manhattan Island and the east bank of the Hudson River; their principal village was on the site of present-day Yonkers, N.Y. The Dutch bought Manhattan Island from them (the sale was made final in 1626) and then practically destroyed them in the wars waged between 1640 and 1645. Thereafter they ceased to have a separate tribal existence.

Manhattan,

city (1990 pop. 37,712), seat of Riley co., NE Kans., at the confluence of the Big Blue and Kansas rivers; inc. 1857. It is the trade and processing center of a farm area. Much of the economy is dependent upon Kansas State Univ. and nearby Fort Riley. The Tuttle Creek Dam and reservoir, with numerous recreational areas, is to the north. Damon Runyon was born in Manhattan.

Manhattan,

borough (1990 pop. 1,487,536), 28 sq mi (57 sq km), New York City, SE N.Y., coextensive with New York co. Manhattan is the cultural and commercial heart of the city, and its dramatic skyline symbolizes New York City around the world. It is composed chiefly of Manhattan Island, and is bounded by the Hudson River on the west, New York Bay on the south, the East River on the east, and the Harlem River and Spuyten Duyvil Creek on the northeast and north. Many bridges, tunnels, and ferries link it to the other boroughs and to New Jersey. A large portion of Manhattan's workers commute to the borough every day.

New York City began as a town built at the tip of S Manhattan. It was called New Amsterdam and served as the capital of the colony of New NetherlandNew Netherland,
territory included in a commercial grant by the government of Holland to the Dutch West India Company in 1621. Colonists were settled along the Hudson River region; in 1624 the first permanent settlement was established at Fort Orange (now Albany, N.Y.).
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 during the Dutch domination. In 1664 the English captured New Netherland and renamed it New York. The boundary of New York City was first extended beyond Manhattan Island when some Westchester co. towns were annexed in 1874. In the consolidation of 1898, Manhattan became one of the five boroughs of New York City. For its history, its cultural, educational, and religious institutions, and other points of interest, see New YorkNew York,
city (1990 pop. 7,322,564), land area 304.8 sq mi (789.4 sq km), SE N.Y., largest city in the United States and one of the largest in the world, on New York Bay at the mouth of the Hudson River.
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, city.

Bibliography

See I. N. P. Stokes, The Iconography of Manhattan Island (6 vol., 1915–28, repr. 1967); R. Shorto, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America (2004). See also bibliography under New YorkNew York,
city (1990 pop. 7,322,564), land area 304.8 sq mi (789.4 sq km), SE N.Y., largest city in the United States and one of the largest in the world, on New York Bay at the mouth of the Hudson River.
..... Click the link for more information.
, city.

Manhattan

 

the central part of New York City, located on Manhattan Island. It forms one of the city’s five administrative boroughs and is bounded in the west by the Hudson River, in the east and south by the East River channel, and in the northeast by the Harlem River. Area, 35 sq km. Population, 1,539,000(1970; 2,332,000 in 1910). Manhattan is a business and commercial center (the southern and to some extent the central sections of the island) and the headquarters of the leading banks, major monopolies, and stock exchange. Piers of the port of New York dot the island’s shores. Manhattan’s streets are mainly laid out in a grid pattern. The main thoroughfare, Broadway, goes from one end of the island to the other. Wall Street, which runs for a few blocks in southern Manhattan, has become a synonym for US financial capital. About 500,000 people are employed in Manhattan’s industry. Light industry (mostly clothing) and printing predominate. In northeastern Manhattan is the Negro ghetto of Harlem.

Manhattan

Manhattan Indians sold the island to Dutch West India Company supposedly for about $24 worth of merchandise (1626). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 305]

Manhattan

1. an island at the N end of New York Bay, between the Hudson, East, and Harlem Rivers: administratively (with adjacent islets) a borough of New York City; a major financial, commercial, and cultural centre. Pop.: 1 537 195 (2000). Area: 47 sq. km (22 sq. miles)
2. a mixed drink consisting of four parts whisky, one part vermouth, and a dash of bitters
References in periodicals archive ?
The Manhattanite has learned to convert wariness into a muscle, which twitches unhappily when not stimulated; the Brooklynite has adapted to greater quantities of boredom and is consequently less afraid of it.
Of the settlement of her case, the injured Manhattanite said, "I am pleased with the outcome and I owe it to Mr.
The Manhattanite wannabe property slinger catches his big break then when he wakes up one day in the fictitious Monopoly City.
Think: Animated adventures of a 13-year-old Manhattanite who possesses the ancient Chinese ability to transform into a dragon .
We've had a couple of dates," is all that the single Manhattanite will give up, and she vows that she won't let him tempt her into breaking her cellibacy.
That play, an enormous hit, showcased a different kind of monster: an ultra-neurotic 50-something Manhattanite.
Manhattanite for 17 years, with a typical high-powered corporate job, a supportive circle of friends, a share in a Fire Island house, and a membership at one of the fiercer gay gyms.
The work hard, play hard, eat out lifestyle of the average Manhattanite dictates that what was once the heart of the home is now a waste of valuable storage space.
Despite the tacky, underwhelming modular setting designed by Matthew Scarpino, the society ladies who surround good-hearted Manhattanite Mary Haines (Aimee Guichard) manage to exude the style-over-substance glamour of pampered women who all have too much time on their hands.
It makes sense, then, that of all his characters, the one that most got under his skin was a Colombian-born gay Manhattanite dying of AIDS in David Rabe's '80s-set play A Question of Mercy, produced in Los Angeles last fall.
How familiar, the interviewer asked, is the average Manhattanite with the cost of housing in the neighborhood?
Getting kicked out of the Boy Scouts for being gay seems an odd route to becoming a celebrated poster child, but James Dale has done just that, The Manhattanite and Eagle Scout is awaiting a final ruling any day from the New Jersey supreme court about his right to be a Scout leader, The Scouts are appealing a lower court ruling that Dale was unfairly discriminated against under the state's 1992 gay civil rights law, "When I think about all the money I spent on uniforms, camps, and merit badges, I get really upset," Dale told The Advocate in 1998, "There are often these drives for kids to go to camp who can't afford it.