Mani Rimdu

Mani Rimdu

Usually November
This Tibetan Buddhist festival is held at the Tengboche gompa (monastery) in Solu Khumbu district high in the Himalayas of Nepal. Merely getting there requires at least a six-day hike in the mountains. But the scenery—which includes Mt. Everest and several lower but equally impressive peaks—is magnificent for those who make it.
Mani Rimdu is a thousand-year-old Buddhist epic that is re-enacted in the courtyard of the monastery. It takes place under a full moon, and begins when masked dancers enter the courtyard in silence. The same re-enactment takes place at the Thami monastery in May or June, although festival organizers in both locations recently have started requesting that foreigners who want to witness the event pay a fee.
CONTACTS:
Nepal Tourism Board, Tourist Service Center
Bhrikuti Mandap
P.O. Box 11018
Kathmandu, Nepal
977-1-4256909; fax: 977-1-4256910
www.welcomenepal.com
Tengboche Monastery Development Project
Tengboche Monastery
Khumbu, Nepal
www.tengboche.org
SOURCES:
WildPlanet-1995, p. 276
References in periodicals archive ?
Decrite par les ethnologues -- et par eux-memes comme constituee de << fervents bouddhistes >> (Fischer 1990), la societe sherpa est scandee par de grandes ritualites: Dumje (en avril), Nyougne (en mai), Kangsur (en juin) et Mani Rimdu (en novembre) qui s'averent des traits saillants de la culture sherpa, parce que distinctifs par rapport a la culture tibetaine dont ils sont issus et avec laquelle ils entendent marquer leur difference (Furer-Haimendorf 1964).
A la difference des grands rituels bouddhistes comme le Mani rimdu, les Mela n'ont jusqu'ici pas beaucoup attire l'attention des observateurs de la vie culturelle et religieuse locale.
Par leurs conditions de mise en scene et leur visibilite sociale, les festivals bouddhistes comme le Mani Rimdu et le Dumje contribuent egalement a reaffirmer la force du bouddhisme et l'unite de la communaute sherpa.
Mani Rimdu et Dumje ne sont pas que les poles opposes d'une meme vie religieuse.
Lord of the Dance: The Mani Rimdu Festival in Tibet and Nepal.
Kohn tells us that he came to Mani Rimdu via an interest in understudied forms of Buddhist temporary art.
At the time of Kohn's research in the Solu-Khumbu district of Nepal (early 1980s to early 1990s), Mani Rimdu (mani ril sgrub, or practice of mani pills) was held at three Sherpa monasteries (Chiwong, Thami, and Tengpoche), as well as Thubten Choling, founded by Tibetan refugees from the Nyingma monastery of Rongphu just north of the border of the TAR.
The first, "Orientations," includes an introduction to the main deities and their entourages and very brief, general remarks on the history of Mani Rimdu and the genre of Tibetan religious dance.
MANI RIMDU: The annual Mani Rimdu at the Thyangbache monastery in Nepal is a site-specific piece of sorts, performed near the roof of the world (and a day's hike from any other human habitation) and often using the full moon as its spotlight.