Mansa Musa


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mansa Musa

(Musa I) (män`sä mo͞o`sä), c.1280–1337, ruler of the Mali empire (1312–37). A devout Muslim, he brought the Mali empire to its greatest height, encompassing what is now Niger and parts of Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, and Ivory Coast. He built schools, libraries, and mosques, and encouraged the development of the arts, architecture, and literature, and Timbuktu became a center of Muslim culture and scholarship. His empire included almost half of the Old World's supply of gold and also was wealthy from taxes on the caravan trade and from salt; he may have been the richest person of all time. His pilgrimage to Mecca in 1324–25 brought Mali fame throughout the world; he traveled with an immense entourage, preceded by 500 slaves carrying staffs decorated with gold. His gifts of gold in Cairo were so lavish that the metal was devalued in Egypt.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of envisioning these polities along the Niger River through a Eurocentric lens that generalizes all African states as decentralized and defines those that had little contact with Europeans as irrelevant, Gomez argues that West African rulers and imperial officials from Mansa Musa to Askia Dawud carved out a space for themselves in the Arabic-speaking world.
Even today's mega-rich, like Amazon founderJeff Bezoswith an estimated fortune of $131bn ([pounds sterling]99bn) doesn't get close to African emperor Mansa Musa.
The early African emperor Mansa Musa turned his stash of gold into one of the world's richest empires.
It has been given the name 'Mansa' -- after the Muslim king of Mali Mansa Musa, the richest man in Africa, who in 1342 made a pilgrimage, or Hajj, to Mecca accompanied by a vast personal entourage and camels laden with gold.
The platform is named after Mansa Musa, the powerful ruler of the West African Malian Empire in the 1300s, who was responsible for opening up trade across Africa by establishing Timbuktu as a commercial, cultural, and religious centre.
"This is my third published book but I consider this one special because it teaches our children as well as adults about our legacy as African Americans; how our history didn't begin with slavery but our ancestors were actually great Kings and Queens," said Robyn, "Imagine tracing your roots and learning King Mansa Musa or Queen Amina is one of your relatives, how amazing would that be!"
Mansa_Musa - by lostislamichistory As a devout Muslim, Mansa Musa insisted on completing the fifth pillar of Islam, the Hajj to Makkah.
The name "Timbutch" and that of the emperor Mansa Musa were inscribed on a Catalan atlas made in the fourteenth century for King Charles V of France.
At this point I feel it is very relevant to go back in our history on the continent to describe one of our great kings of Mali, Mansa Musa (12.80-1331), who manufactured and stored so much gold that the West are now calling him the richest person in all of history.
*** As we wind up this year's Haj coverage, it worth recalling this interesting Haj nugget: It seems that one of the most spectacular pilgrimages ever made was that of Mansa Musa, the King of Mali.
Mansa Musa I topped a 25-strong list of royals, bankers and industrialists from the past 1,000 years.