Mantua

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Mantua

(măn`cho͞oə, –to͞oə), Ital. Mantova, city (1991 pop. 53,065), capital of Mantova prov., Lombardy, N Italy, bordered on three sides by lakes formed by the Mincio River. It is an agricultural, industrial, and tourist center. Manufactures include machinery, metals, furniture, and refined petroleum. Originally an Etruscan settlement, Mantua was later a Roman town and afterward a free commune (12th–13th cent.). It flourished under the GonzagaGonzaga
, Italian princely house that ruled Mantua (1328–1708), Montferrat (1536–1708), and Guastalla (1539–1746). The family name is derived from the castle of Gonzaga, a village near Mantua.
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 family (1328–1708), who were magnificent patrons of the arts. Mantua passed to Austria in 1708, was taken by Napoleon I in 1797, was retaken by Austria in 1815, and was returned to Italy in 1866. The Gonzaga palace (13th–18th cent.), among the largest and finest in Europe, has frescoes by Mantegna and Giulio Romano and numerous other works of art. Other landmarks include the Palazzo del Te (1525–35); the Church of Sant' Andrea (15th–18th cent.), designed by Alberti, where Mantegna is buried; and the law courts (13th cent.).

Mantua

 

(also Mantova), a city in Northern Italy, in Lombardy. It is located on an island in a lake-like widening of the Mincio River, near its confluence with the Po. It is the capital of the province of Mantua. Population, 65,900 (1971); river port and railroad junction. Industrial activities include oil refining and the production of petrochemicals. Other important products are agricultural machinery, ceramics, paper, furniture, silk, and sugar.

Mantua, which was founded by the Etruscans, is the site of the Accademia Virgiliana (Vergilian Academy of Arts and Sciences). Nearby is the little town of Pietole (known in ancient times as Andes), which is considered to be the birthplace of Vergil. During the 15th and 16th centuries, Mantua was one of the centers of the Italian Renaissance. Between 1628 and 1631 a war was fought for the territory of Mantua and Montferrat.

Mantua has many noteworthy medieval architectural monuments. On the Piazza delle Erbe are located the Rotunda di San Lorenzo (11th century), the Palazzo della Ragione (1250), and the Palazzo Broletto (1227-73). The Piazza Sordello is the site of the Palazzo Bonacolsi (13th century) and the cathedral (rebuilt in 1545 by Giulio Romano). Also in Mantua are the Palazzo Ducale complex, which is now a museum (1290-1708; including the apartments of Isabella d’Este, 16th century), and the Castle of St. George (1395-1406, architect Bartolino Ploti da Novara; including the Camera degli Sposi with frescoes by Mantegna, 1474). Renaissance churches in the city include San Sebastiano (1460) and Sant’ Andrea (1472-94), which were both designed by L. B. Alberti and executed by the architect L. Fancelli. There are several buildings by Giulio Romano in Mantua, including the Palazzo di Giustizia (1530) and the Palazzo del Te (1525-34). Another noteworthy building in the city is the Palazzo del Accademia Virgiliana (facade by architect G. Piermarini, 1773).

REFERENCE

Mantova: La storia, le lettere, le arti, vols. 1-9. Mantua, 1958-65.

Mantua

a city in N Italy, in E Lombardy, surrounded by lakes: birthplace of Virgil. Pop.: 47 790 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus George Tuberville (1540-97?), in the preface to his translation of Mantuan's eclogues, defends the genre against charges of being 'ouerrude and barbarous' by insisting on the academic sophistication of literary shepherds:
Leone de' Sommi's life coincided roughly with the halcyon days of the Mantuan Jewish community.
Reading Sceve's Arion in the light of the Virgilian pastoral tradition of the Renaissance (Mantuan, Jacopo Sannazaro, Luigi Alamanni), paying particular attention to these two earliest, genre-establishing Marotic eclogues, the present article argues that through an apprehensive apprenticeship with the verse of his era's archpoet, Sceve eventually mobilizes Marot's bucolic influence to poetic ends and successfully carves a pastoral niche for himself, ultimately surpassing his French and Latin models.
In this lucid, carefully crafted, and judicious study, Murphy draws on a wealth of untapped personal correspondence and administrative records in the Mantuan archives to rescue Gonzaga from this cliche and to flesh out the portrait of one of Italy's most powerful, privileged, and--until the end--respected prelates.
It is true that he did not indicate the real names, but gave them the names "Lohengrin Lohengrinovich," and "Mantuan Mantuanovich." It was not hard to guess that it was about Kozlovskiy and Lemeshev.
The objects, like the Mantuan bowl of "Street Haunting," can thus become reinvested with the affective content that fills the hollow spaces of a sympathy based solely on knowledge.
For example, Chew's essay provides a lucid introduction to the ideas of musical imitation, emulation, and intertextuality; Ossi's contribution on the Mantuan madrigals neatly summarizes his distinguished earlier work on these pieces; and Kurtzman's article provides a thoughtful digest of Monteverdi's duties as a composer of sacred music at Mantua, along with an admirable review of the vexed questions surrounding the so-called 1610 Vespers.
The Mantuan center, looking forward to the sixth centennial of Alberti's birth (18 February 1404), organized no less than eight congresses and three exhibitions that took place between 2002 and 2006: the fruit of two of the eight congresses, almost 1,000 pages of scholarly work, make up the volumes reviewed here.
This is dedicated to the early Mantuan vernacular used in the translation of a thirteenth-century Latin encyclopaedic work, De proprietate rerum by the English scholar Bartolomeus Anglicus.
How can I ever forget being smuggled out of a conference session in 1999, for a personal guided tour of the highly important sixteenth-century commedia frescos (five illustrated in colour in I Gonzaga e l'Impero), he had recently discovered behind the whitewashed walls of the Jewish quarter's Palazzo Berla, now the Mantuan headquaters of the Collegio Notarile?
Of course diplomatic rhetoric must be viewed with scepticism; the Mantuan ambassador haggled subtly by suggesting that a suitably large dowry was entirely in the interest of the bride since it represented her own financial security.
After relative stagnation during the Christian Middle Ages, the tradition was revitalized by neoclassical artisans including Petrarch (Bucolicum carmen, 1348) and Mantuan (Bucolica, 1508), and culminated, in English, in the work of familiar writers like Edmund Spenser (The Shepheardes Calendar, 1579), Philip Sidney (Arcadia, c.1580), and John Milton ("Lycidas," 1638).