Manych


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Manych

(mä`nĭch), two rivers, SE European Russia. The Western Manych, c.200 mi (320 km) long, rises near Stavropol in the N Caucasus and flows NW through Lake Manych-Gudilo into the lower Don River. The Eastern Manych rises in a marshy area and flows c.100 mi (160 km) east to a system of salt lakes and marshes c.75 mi (120 km) W of the Caspian Sea, but it reaches the sea only in rare spring floods. In spring the Western and Eastern Manych join in the center of the Manych Depression, a broad, valleylike lowland extending c.350 mi (560 km) southeast from the lower Don to the Caspian Sea. A variant spelling is Manich.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Manych

 

the general name for lakes and rivers within the Kumo-Manych Depression—the salt lakes Manych-Gudilo (344 sq km), Manych (Malyi Manych, 78.8 sq km), and Manych (10.7 sq km) and the Rivers Zapadnyi Manych, Vostochnyi Manych, and Manych (a tributary of Lake Manych-Gudilo).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the motherland of such finewool breeds as Stavropol Breed, Caucasian Breed, Soviet Merino, Manych Merino and semifine-wool Northern Caucasian meat-wool breed.
bugensis Lake Ontario, US 1990 2003 Lake Eric, US 1989 2002 Southern Lake Michigan, 16-31 m 1997 2008 Soulanges Canal, Canada 1990 2002 Volga Delta, Russia 1992 2000 River Don, Russia (sites 1980 1999 1, 6-8, 11) Manych River, Russia 1980 1999 (sites 12-15) Kuybyshev Reservoir, Russia 1992 2001 Saratov Reservoir, Russia 1992 1998 Average ([+ or -] SE) for D.
The Caspian Sea has no outlet; however, it is linked to the Sea of Azov, the northern section of the Black Sea, through the Volga-Don and Manych Canals.
This depression now forms the valleys of the rivers Kuma and Manych, a tectonic depression that separates the pre-Caucasus from the plains of eastern Europe.