Maroboduus

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Maroboduus

 

Born in the second half of the first century B.C.; died A.D. 37 in Ravenna. Leader of the Marcomanni.

Maroboduus came from a noble family. As a youth he lived in Rome and was educated at the court of Emperor Augustus. After the Marcomanni moved into the territory of present-day Bohemia (8 B.C.), Maroboduus united the Marcomanni with neighboring tribes and became head of a powerful confederation of tribes. He organized an army on the Roman model (70,000 infantrymen and 4,000 cavalrymen). In A.D. 17, Maroboduus’ army was beaten by Arminius, the leader of the Cherusci. In A.D. 19, Maroboduus was overthrown by the nobility and forced to seek refuge with the Romans.

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Wright's two-volume collection includes texts by Geoffrey of Winchester, Hugh the Chanter, Reginald of Canterbury, Marbod of Rennes, and Alain de Lille among others, and provides an appendix containing the eighth-century English riddles of Tatwine and Aldhelm.
This was despite the criticism directed against Robert in around 1096/97 by Marbod of Rennes (then still functioning as archdeacon at Angers, in the service of Fulk IV), charging him with some undisclosed 'sin'.
20) From 1978 to 1981, von Marbod was the Deputy Director, Defense Security Assistance Administration.
When Hermann wants to convince Marbod of the truthfulness of his letter, he offers the lives of his two sons and a dagger.
This portion of the book includes not only the fully moralized "natural history" of a Bestiarium but also Marbod of Rennes's poem on gems, frequently laid under contribution for similar materials.
7) He was especially criticized by Marbod, Bishop of Rennes, and Geoffrey of Vendome.
None of the articles in this anthology examines the male poets of same-sex desire that Thomas Stehling collected in his seminal 1984 text Medieval Latin Poems of Male Love and Friendship, such as Baudri de Bourgueil, Marbod of Rennes, or Hilary the Englishman.
This book is a welcome presentation and analysis of the medieval textual tradition purporting to defend the good name of women, from Marbod of Rennes (and his scriptural sources) and Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim to Christine de Pizan, Chaucer, and Jean Le Fevre.
Although it is possible that Abelard studied with Marbod, master of the cathedral school of Angers, and with Roscelin of Compiegne, a well-known dialectician at Loches, little is known of his training before he appeared in Paris about 1100, a student of William of Champeaux, the foremost teacher of his day.
Among the familiar faces and others we would like to know better are Marbod of Rennes, Abelard, Andreas Capellanus, Etienne of Fougeres, Nicolas Bozon, Boccaccio, Jean L.
In Woman Defamed and Woman Defended: An Anthology of Medieval Texts (Oxford University Press, 1992), Blamires, a senior lecturer in English at the University of Wales, Lampeter, collected misogynist tracts from authors as diverse as Marbod of Rennes and Boccaccio, concluding with examples from the rudiments of the "defense of women" tradition.