Marburg School


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Marburg School

 

a trend in neo-Kantianism of the late 19th century in Germany.

The Marburg school was founded by H. Cohen and P. Natorp, professors at the University of Marburg. F. A. Lange was a forerunner of the Marburg school. Members of the school included A. Buchenau, A. Gb’rland, and W. Kinckel and, initially, E. Cassirer and N. Hartmann. Distinct from the Baden school of neo-Kantianism, which was concerned with the problem of values, the Marburg School dealt, for the most part, with epistemology, logic, and methodology.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Marburg School, beginning with Cohen, attempted to divorce the epistemic conditions for the unity of consciousness from psychological or naturalist explanations.
Kim discusses the key question of the influence of Plato on Neo-Kantianism and on phenomenology, and focuses on the virtues of the reading of Plato of Paul Natorp, a member of the Marburg school, and on Heidegger's criticisms of that reading.
This element is absent from Carnap's dissertation, written under Bruno Bauch (a student of Rickert's who was also interested in the Marburg school and in Frege), on the notion of space.
By bringing Husserl's mature approach into cooperation with the systematic concerns of German idealism, the Marburg school's philosophy of culture, and twentieth-century hermeneutics, Luft's work, at his most ambitious, outlines a prolegomenon to a future transcend-dental philosophy.
He introduces us to the Marburg School and to Neo-Kantianism, which he characterizes as a nuanced reaction to positivism and scientism and a rejection of irrationalism.
The philosophical traditions with which the Circle engaged were the Neo-Kantianism of the Marburg School, Lebensphilosophie, and Georg Simmel's account of the relationship between life and culture, Phenomenology, and Gestalt theory.
Influenced by the Marburg School of neo-Kantian philosophy and phenomenology, Sesemann also stood quite close to Russian Formalism, and was ahead of his time in more than one way.
Vazquez Lobeiras mentions three main Kant interpretations in the twentieth century: one based on the theory of knowledge (after the Marburg school), the second based on metaphysics (after Martin Heidegger), and the third based on the history of logic (after Giorgio Tonelli).