Marcellus of Ancyra


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Marcellus of Ancyra

(märsĕl`əs, ănsī`rə), fl. 350, Galatian churchman, the most violent opponent of ArianismArianism
, Christian heresy founded by Arius in the 4th cent. It was one of the most widespread and divisive heresies in the history of Christianity. As a priest in Alexandria, Arius taught (c.
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 in Asia Minor. He developed the theory that the Trinity was the result of emanations from God that would ultimately revert to God in the final judgment. Marcellus practically denied all distinction between Father and Son, thus teaching a virtual Sabellianism (see SabelliusSabellius,
fl. 215, Christian priest and theologian, b. probably Libya or Egypt. He went to Rome, became the leader of those who accepted the doctrine of modalistic monarchianism, and was excommunicated by Pope St. Calixtus I in 220.
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) that proved embarrassing to his orthodox defenders. His views were eventually condemned.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patrick's College, Maynooth, Ireland) provides an overview to the conference topic in the first essay, with subsequent topics including changes in the concept of pedagogical soteriology in early Byzantium to reflect the philosophy of Athanasius, the writings of Marcellus of Ancyra, St.
A useful question may be to discern when he does not polarize, such as in his alliance with Marcellus of Ancyra or at the terminological compromises in Alexandria in 362.
CONTRA MARCELLUM: MARCELLUS OF ANCYRA AND FOURTH-CENTURY THEOLOGY.
Although he was not a major figure in the fourth century, Marcellus of Ancyra became well known, and even notorious in the 50 years following the Council of Nicaea because of the mostly negative reaction to his teaching.
Instead, the primary debates were (to oversimplify a complex situation) between those who supported the theological perspective of Eusebius of Caesarea and those who backed the theological perspective of Marcellus of Ancyra.
Like the Homoians, Basil and his party had roots in Eusebian theology, and there are a number of similarities between their two perspectives, especially their common opposition to Marcellus of Ancyra.
For several decades after the Council of Nicaea, most Eastern bishops knew for sure that what Marcellus of Ancyra had said about God was wrong; they were less certai about what was right.
It is very difficult to explain the seemingly paradoxical fact that this word, along with the explanation given by Constantine, was accepted by the "Arian" Eusebius, whereas it has left no traces at all in the works of his opponents, the leaders of the anti-Arian party such as Alexander of Alexandria, Ossius of Cordova, Marcellus of Ancyra, and Eustathius of Antioch, who are usually considered Constantine's theological advisers and the strongest supporters of the council.
It is no coincidence that at the council of the "Western" bishops held at Sardica in 343, where Ossius could freely express his thoughts in agreement with Marcellus of Ancyra, the word homoousios was totally ignored and replaced by mia hypostasis: "We have received and been taught, and we hold the catholic and apostolic tradition and faith and confession which teach, that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost have one hypostasis.
This is why the word homoousios is not to be found in the extant writings of Alexander of Alexandria and Marcellus of Ancyra.
Marcellus of Ancyra was well aware that Eusebius of Caesarea had often maintained the existence of two distinct divine ousiai.
Condemned and excommunicated by several fourth-century councils and synods, Marcellus of Ancyra (ca.