Marches

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Marches

the
1. the border area between England and Wales or Scotland, both characterized by continual feuding (13th--16th centuries)
2. a region of central Italy. Capital: Ancona. Pop.: 1 484 601 (2003 est.). Area: 9692 sq. km (3780 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
To begin with David Mathew was certainly no marcher lord. The marcher lordship of Glamorgan in the 15th century was in the far more exalted hands of the earls of Warwick and Worcester, and later the crown.
That was certainly the case for the Marcher lords, noblemen who settled in the borderlands during the years following the Norman Conquest, ruling over the locals.
It lay at the heart of turbulent power struggles between English kings, Welsh princes and Marcher lords. Tours are on the hour from 11am.
His family had fought for Llywelyn ap Gruffydd in a previous war and regained their lands in north-east Wales through a calculated association with the powerful Marcher lords of Chirk, Bromfield and Yale.
The Welsh, English and Marcher Lords fought hard for control of the territory and the legacy is Monmouthshire's rich and colourful history, characterised by more castles per square mile than anywhere else in Britain.
The de Briouze family were Marcher lords, ruling conquered Gower from their castles at Swansea and Oystermouth and keeping a firm hand on the native Welsh.
In this letter I Seaton describes in detail (I quote): "Rees Davies, professor of Medieval History at All Souls College, Oxford, in his magisterial work The Revolt of Owain Glyndwr, described the state of the country in 1399 as impoverished, its resources ruthlessly exploited by both the English Crown and Marcher lords and its rather progressive laws replaced by those of England, aspects of which resembled those of apartheid South Africa.
She also had a lover, Roger Mortimer, an enemy of Edward and one of the Marcher Lords who ruled the wild country where the Midlands folds into Wales.
The rightful new owner of this unique property would be an historian - expert on early architecture, the Marcher Lords, the Cluniac monks, the powerful Mortimers or Cliffords, Henry or Richard ll.
The Battle of Orewin Bridge (also known as the Battle of Irfon Bridge) was fought between English (led by the Marcher Lords) and Welsh armies on December 11, 1282 near Builth Wells.
THERE is little doubt the Tibetans view the Chinese in much the same way the Welsh did the Normans/English under Edward I or the murderous, land-grabbing Marcher Lords.