Mardonius

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Mardonius

(märdō`nēəs), d. 479 B.C., Persian general; son-in-law of Darius I. Darius sent him (492 B.C.) to retaliate against Eretria and Athens for aiding the Ionians in the Persian WarsPersian Wars,
500 B.C.–449 B.C., series of conflicts fought between Greek states and the Persian Empire. The writings of Herodotus, who was born c.484 B.C., are the great source of knowledge of the history of the wars.
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, but his fleet was lost in a storm off Mt. Athos, and a Thracian tribe destroyed a large part of his army. He helped Xerxes IXerxes I
(Xerxes the Great) , d. 465 B.C., king of ancient Persia (486–465 B.C.). His name in Old Persian is Khshayarsha, in the Bible Ahasuerus. He was the son of Darius I and Atossa, daughter of Cyrus the Great. After bringing (484 BC.
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 plan his invasion of Greece. Xerxes returned (480 B.C.) to Persia after his defeat at Salamis and left Mardonius in command in Greece. Mardonius was defeated and killed at Plataea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perto de Plateia, onde se deu a derradeira vitoria sobre os persas em 479, com a derrota do general Mardonios, ocorreram, promovidos pelas cidades-Estado gregas vencedoras, os Jogos da Liberdade, nos quais a hoplitodromia, cuja partida se dava no Monumento a Vitoria, se destacava entre as demais provas, seguindo inclusive regras especiais: por exemplo, o desafio aumentava para quinze estadios (c.
Et chez les Atheniens non plus, poursuivit-il, je ne prise pas les depenses fastueuses qu'ils firent pour leur cite et les temples autant que tous les hauts faits qu'accomplirent leurs ancetres; car, dans le cimeterre de Mardonios ou les boucliers des Laconiens pris a Pylos ils ont une offrande aux dieux bien plus considerable et venerable que dans les Propylees de l'Acropole et l'Olympieion, qui coute plus de dix mille talents.
Baragwanath turns next to Mardonios' "mythic" self-presentation in Herodotos' text, a Mardonios trapped--albeit unknowingly--in Hellenic "mythicizing patterns" (298).
Mardonios astride his white horse was a conspicuous target for retribution.
We may note various things, both great and small, organized to keep the fleet effective: the canal and its breakwaters, prepared to avoid 20 miles of lee shore along Athos where Mardonios' fleet had come to grief in 492 (7.22.3); the food dumps for both army and fleet (7.25); the race which may point to more widespread competitive training (7.44); the provision on board ship of myrrh and bandages for first aid, which saved Pytheas (7.181.2); and the marking of the Ant (7.183.2).
Here the account tells how Mardonios renewed the attack against the Greeks in the hope of sending word of victory back to Xerxes in Sardis.
Except for cavalry skirmishes, neither side wanted to engage in battle until the sacrifices were propitious, but Mardonios' patience broke first, and he fell into a trap at Plataea, where he was killed and his army routed; there were twenty thousand Persian and Boeotian casualties against ninety-one Spartans and fifty-two Athenians killed.