Marduk

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Marduk

(mär`do͝ok), ancient god of Babylonia and chief god of the city of Babylon. His cult rose to prominence in the reign of Hammurabi, and Marduk became the omniscient king of the pantheon—the creator of mankind and the god of light and life. In his various aspects he was the successor of the Sumerian earth god Enlil.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Marduk

 

patron god of the city of Babylon; after the 18th century B.C., supreme deity in the Babylonian pantheon.

According to Babylonian myth, Marduk was the son of the god Ea and was elected king by the council of gods. He led their war with the forces of the primeval monsters and slew the monsters’ female commander, Tiamat, after which he created the earth and people to serve the gods. He was identified with Enlil. The Babylonian priests of the mid-first millennium B.C. declared all divinities to be incarnations of Marduk.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Marduk

warrior god, chief of the Babylonian pantheon; creator of heaven, earth, and man. [Babylonian Myth.: Benét, 634]
See: God
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.