Marduk


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Marduk: Tiamat

Marduk

(mär`do͝ok), ancient god of Babylonia and chief god of the city of Babylon. His cult rose to prominence in the reign of Hammurabi, and Marduk became the omniscient king of the pantheon—the creator of mankind and the god of light and life. In his various aspects he was the successor of the Sumerian earth god Enlil.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Marduk

 

patron god of the city of Babylon; after the 18th century B.C., supreme deity in the Babylonian pantheon.

According to Babylonian myth, Marduk was the son of the god Ea and was elected king by the council of gods. He led their war with the forces of the primeval monsters and slew the monsters’ female commander, Tiamat, after which he created the earth and people to serve the gods. He was identified with Enlil. The Babylonian priests of the mid-first millennium B.C. declared all divinities to be incarnations of Marduk.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Marduk

warrior god, chief of the Babylonian pantheon; creator of heaven, earth, and man. [Babylonian Myth.: Benét, 634]
See: God
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enuma elis narrates a battle against a chaos monster Ti'amtu, (14) who threatens the divine order, a victory that establishes Marduk as the supreme god.
According to this story, Marduk, the male God split the body of the female god, Tiamat, lifted up one half of her body, divided the waters above and set stars and planets underneath.
Like Shaikh Khalid, Bahrain's Abdulrahman Al Saad on Marduk had to withdraw from the race after five stages.
In the Mesopotamian Epic of Creation, the absolute ruler, Marduk, slays the bull man (kusarikku, or "bison") so that he may become "the bestower of ploughland who fixes [its] boundaries, creator of grain and linseed, producer of vegetation" (Tablet VII).
As I read them, I could not help but wonder how Abraham reacted to the account of the fighting of the many gods, to the chief male god's (Marduk's) killing of the head female deity (Tiamat), his standing on her body and then cutting her in two to make the heavens and earth, and then using the blood of another god he had killed to make humans to be slaves of the deities.
His traveling companion and old friend, Melchior, called the Father of Fathers Mihr, while others referred to Him as Bel, Marduk, Zeus, or Mylitta.
Babylon's soaring, pyramid-shaped Temple of Marduk is thought to have inspired the tale of the Tower of Babel, while their conquest of the Kingdom of Judah in the early sixth century BC led to the deportation and exile of the nation's Jewish population.
He was a follower of the Mesopotamian moon god, Sin, worshipped at Al-Ula, whereas the official god of Babylon was Marduk. He remained in Al-Ula for ten years before returning to Babylon.
There are black metal bands like Dark Funeral (Vobiscum Satanas [Metal Blade 14173, 1998]), Dissection (Storm of the Light's Bane [Nuclear Blast Records 6129, 1996]), and Marduk (Plague Angel [Candlelight 167, 2005]), who are every bit as serious in their commitment to the dark side as their Norwegian brethren.