Marginal Plateau

marginal plateau

[′mär·jən·əl pla′tō]
(geology)
A relatively flat shelf adjacent to a continent and similar topographically to, but deeper than, a continental shelf.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Marginal Plateau

 

a relief element of the continental slope. It is a relatively flat step tilted in the direction of the ocean, with a width of up to several hundred kilometers (more frequently dozens of kilometers). It is assumed that the marginal plateaus were formed by the tectonic subsidence of sections of the continental shelf, because the geologic structure of the plateaus usually resembles the adjacent parts of the shelf. Examples of marginal plateaus are the Blake Plateau east of Florida and the Chukchi Plateau in the Arctic Ocean.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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