margin

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margin

1. Commerce the profit on a transaction
2. Economics the minimum return below which an enterprise becomes unprofitable

margin

[′mär·jən]
(geography)
The boundary around a body of water.
(graphic arts)
The blank area at the vertical and horizontal edges of a printed page.
(science and technology)
An outside limit.

margin

1. The exposed flat surface of the stiles and rails which form the framing around a panel.
2. The projecting surface above the stair nosings in a close string.
3. The mitered border around a hearth.
4. The exposed surface of a slate or tile which is not covered by the one above.

margin

A blank row at the extreme top and bottom or a blank column at the extreme left and right sides of a sheet of paper or on-screen window. Margins are used for design purposes as well as to accommodate printers that cannot print to the very edge of the paper. See margin guide and gutter.
References in periodicals archive ?
And another of what she's having." Now his voice became soothing and professional, and Margo recognized it was the same voice she used when she had to break unpleasant news to patients.
There is an interesting possibility in here, though, that's worth thinking about if you really like Margo so far:
Says Margo: "Cywain has been 100% behind us and has given us support and training - such as the selling skills course I went on at the Vale Resort.
Margo described the city of El Paso as a "melting pot" and disagreed with President Trump's intention to end family migration.
One of the difficult things for Margo is seeing Darren's little brother Ryan growing up without him.
Margo would be a part of something but separate too.
Margo's collapse, unraveling, and gradual recovery bring The End of Miracles to a conclusion of forgiveness and hope.
Healthcare Trust of America (NYSE:HTA) reported on Thursday the addition of Margo Gangloff as regional manager for its Southeast Region.
The primary target of this ruthlessness is Margo. Eve, feigning her devotion and fictionalising a sob story recounting the loss of her husband, Eddie, during World War II, wins Margo's sympathy and becomes, in Margo's words, her 'sister, lawyer, mother, friend, psychiatrist and cop'.
Margo narrates this compelling standalone sequel, although tantalizing backstory will lure readers to its previous novel.