Marie de' Medici


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Medici, Marie de':

see Marie de' MediciMarie de' Medici
, 1573–1642, queen of France, second wife of King Henry IV and daughter of Francesco de' Medici, grand duke of Tuscany. She was married to Henry in 1600. After his assassination (1610) she became regent for her son Louis XIII.
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Marie de' Medici

(mĕd`ĭchē), 1573–1642, queen of France, second wife of King Henry IV and daughter of Francesco de' Medici, grand duke of Tuscany. She was married to Henry in 1600. After his assassination (1610) she became regent for her son Louis XIII. She reversed the policies set by her husband; the duc de SullySully, Maximilien de Béthune, duc de
, 1560–1641, French statesman. Born and reared a Protestant, he fought in the Wars of Religion under the Huguenot leader Henry of Navarre (later King Henry IV of France). Before 1606 he was known as baron de Rosny.
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 was replaced by her favorite, Concini, and the carefully hoarded treasury surplus was dissipated in court extravagance and in pensions to the discontented nobles. In foreign affairs she abandoned the traditional anti-Hapsburg policy. A new Franco-Spanish alliance was formed by the marriage of Louis to Anne of Austria, daughter of King Philip III of Spain, and was further cemented by the marriage of the French princess Elizabeth to the future Philip IV of Spain. Having remained in power for three years beyond the king's majority, Marie was forced into exile after the murder of Concini (1617). In 1619 her partisans rose in revolt, but she was reconciled to her son in 1622. After the rise to power of her former favorite, Cardinal RichelieuRichelieu, Armand Jean du Plessis, duc de
(Cardinal Richelieu) , 1585–1642, French prelate and statesman, chief minister of King Louis XIII, cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.
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, she attempted (1630) to regain influence by urging the king to dismiss his minister of state; instead Louis forced his mother into a new exile at Compiègne, whence she fled to the Netherlands (1631), never to return to France. She was the mother of Henrietta Maria, queen of Charles I of England. The marriage of Marie and Henry IV was the subject of a celebrated series of paintings by Peter Paul Rubens.

Bibliography

See biographies by J. Pardoe (3 vol., 1852), A. P. Lord (1903), and L. Batiffol (1906; tr. 1908, repr. 1970).

References in periodicals archive ?
Marie de' Medici supported the opening of a Jesuit college in Paris despite opposition from the University, the Parlement, and parish priests.
In this recent contribution to late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century French history, marking the transition from the reign of Henry III to that of Henry IV and beyond, to the regency of Marie de' Medici and the early reign of Louis XIII, Gilbert Schrenck, editor of Pierre de l'Estoile and Agrippa d'Aubigne, addresses yet another aspect of the political and ideological debates of this era.
The story of the Gentileschi is a tale so exemplary of its time and place- -beginning on the raucous streets of Rome in the early 1600s and ending at the courts of Marie de' Medici in France and Charles I in England--that it could almost have been scripted by one of the great playwrights of the era.
Another work was sent to Marie de' Medici, who invited Orazio to Paris.
Malvasia indicated that Reni's relationships with Philip IV Habsburg, Pope Urban VIII and his nephew Cardinal Francesco Barberini, the papal legate Cardinal Bernardino Spada, and Marie de' Medici helped shape the Helen.
In a nutshell, the Barberini had Spada offer the painting to Marie de' Medici; she, however, was exiled before it reached her and it ended up in a Lyon merchant's hands.