Marie de l'Incarnation

Marie de l'Incarnation

(də lăNkärnäsyôN`), 1599–1672, French missionary. Her name was originally Marie Guyard. She was married in her youth and bore a son; when her son was 12 years old, her husband being dead, she entered the Ursuline order. At her entreaty, the authorities gave her and another nun permission to go to New France to work among the Native Americans. In 1639 she arrived in Quebec, where she was soon head of an Ursuline convent. She administered her house with great success and worked among the Native Americans with notable results. Her letters are valuable sources of French Canadian history. She wrote devotional works and catechisms, not only in French but in Native American languages.

Bibliography

See A. Repplier, Mère Marie of the Ursulines (1931).

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Arriving in Quebec in 1639, and with funding secured from a French benefactress, Marie de l'Incarnation established a convent as well as the first school for girls in the New World.
Patricia Demers' chapter extends the ambit of the volume by comparing Collins' spiritual concerns with those of Mere Marie de l'Incarnation, a French Ursuline nun who travelled to Canada to undertake missionary work.
lt;<L'experience mystique, sommet de l'emergence du sujet chez Marie de l'Incarnation, ou la dynamique du mariage spirituel>>.
Harvey contends that the four women she studies--Anne Bradstreet and Anne Hutchinson in New England, Sor Juana fries de la Cruz in Mexico, and Marie de l'Incarnation in Quebec--deploy this second concept of modesty in their writings and use it both to engage a wide range of discourses familiar to the authors and to challenge the misogynist claims within them.
Jean de Brebeuf, a missionary in Canada from 1625 to 1649, and Catherine's celestial cathedral guide, was a practicing mystic during his life, as was the famous Ursuline nun and writer, Marie de l'Incarnation, when she arrived in Quebec in 1639.
in 1615, taking the name of Marie de l'Incarnation.
Her central text here is a fascinating document about the life of Sor Catalina de Jesus y San Francisco, written by her son, Juan Bernique (and here Natalie Zemon Davis's analysis of the similar case of Marie de l'Incarnation might have produced some interesting comparisons).
We know all this from the testimony of one sister who survived, Marie de l'Incarnation, who was not with the others in Compiegne, but in Paris, when the nuns' arrests occurred.
Les religieuses evoquees par l'auteure dans son premier chapitre sont, comme la fondatrice du monastere, Marie de l'Incarnation, des femmes volontaires, ayant une experience de vie et un remarquable sens pratique qu'elles appliquent avec determination: leurs broderies delicates sont clairement appliquees a la banniere d'une << oeuvre de civilisation >>.
Chapter 4, on the Ursuline Marie de l'Incarnation, reads the life of this mystic and missionary as charting the move from a baroque refusal (via masochistic abjection) of the oedipal, sexed body, to a Classical body once more triumphant in its redeemed purity.