marimba

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marimba:

see xylophonexylophone
[Gr.,=wood sound], musical instrument having graduated wooden slabs that are struck by the player with small, hard mallets. The slabs are usually arranged like a keyboard, and the range varies from two to four octaves.
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Marimba

 

(1) A percussion instrument that is common among many peoples of Africa; it is a variety of xylophone. The modern xylophone, which has metal resonating pipes, is also known as a marimba.

(2) A reed instrument that is plucked; found in the Congo and some other localities in the eastern part of Africa. In other regions of Africa it is known as the zanza.

marimba

a Latin American percussion instrument consisting of a set of hardwood plates placed over tuned metal resonators, played with two soft-headed sticks in each hand

Marimba

(Marimba, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, www.marimba.com) A software company founded in 1996 by four key members of Sun's original Java development team. In 1996, it introduced Castanet, a family of Java-based delivery systems for publishing and automatically distributing application updates and other published materials via the Internet and intranets. Other Marimba products addressed the key areas of security management, infrastructure management and change and configuration management.

In 2004, BMC Software (www.bmc.com) acquired Marimba and rapidly integrated its products and technologies into its line of business service management (BSM) software.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appearing as guest artists, six-mallet marimbist Sean Wagoner and alto saxophonist Brad Foley will play Divertimento for Marimba and Alto Saxophone by Akira Yuyama.
He then proceeds to the book's longest section, "Important Performer/Leaders and Their Groups," in which he lists, in rough historical sequence, biodata of a number of prominent marimbists active in the twentieth century.
Group cohesion is excellent, and their fast tremolo (so different from the slower North-American concert style) is generally very good, approaching the best lithe muneca (wrist) quality so prized among Chiapan marimbists (see my "Munecas de Chiapaneco: The Economic Impact of Self-Image in the World of the Mexican Marimba," Latin American Music Review 1 [1980]: 34-46).