Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan

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Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan,

1896–1953, American author, b. Washington, D.C., grad. Univ. of Wisconsin, 1918. She was a journalist until 1928, when she moved to the Florida backwoods, where most of her novels are set. Cross Creek (1942) is a humorous autobiographical account of her life there. The Yearling (1938; Pulitzer Prize), is the story of a boy and his pet deer. Her other novels include South Moon Under (1933), Golden Apples (1935), and The Sojourner (1953).

Bibliography

See her correspondence with Maxwell Perkins (2000).

References in periodicals archive ?
Only a few miles southeast of the university-metropolis Gainesville, within commuting distance, Cross Creek was the home of one of the best-known writers of the other Florida, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.
"Then The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, because it's a heartbreaking story set in the wilderness of the Everglades of Florida - and just riveting.
Indeed, Cross Creek by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, initially published by Scribner's in 1942, is one indication of how little significance the "A" can have.
Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan with Dillion, Leo and Diane
Perloo--that's what Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings called it in her book, Cross Creek Cookery.
In "Max and Marjorie: An Editorial Love Story," too, Gottlieb is in finest form, mapping the epistolary friendship between lionized Scribner editor Maxwell Perkins and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, author of The Yearling.
Especially of interest for many will be Sharpless' depiction of the complex relationship between author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and her long-time cook, Idella Parker.
Johns offers plentiful wildlife and nature in a setting that could have been lifted from Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' Cross Creek writings.
Another notable hiking trail is The Yearling Trail, a historic stretch of land that inspired Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Yearling.
Other authors discussed include Zora Neale Hurston, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Ellen Glasgow, Helen Keller, and Lillian Smith.
Crossing the Creek: The Literary Friendship of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
In the later chapters, Prenshaw deftly examines the personal stories of accomplished fiction writers (Ellen Glasgow, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Zora Neale Hurston, Bernice Kelly Harris, Eudora Welty, Elizabeth Spencer, and Ellen Douglas), whose life writings demonstrate the literary sophistication, narrative facility, and keen observations of successful novelists.