Akenside, Mark

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Akenside, Mark

(ā`kĭnsīd), 1721–70, English poet and physician. His chief literary work was the didactic poem The Pleasures of Imagination (1744). Among his other works are the neoclassical Odes on Various Subjects (1745) and the Epistle to Curio (1744), a vigorous political satire. Akenside's conversion to Tory principles at the accession of George III earned him the appointment of physician to the queen.
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While the anthology covers the didactic, evangelistic core of the graveyard school that came to prominence mid-century, it also extends beyond this to include cynical uses of graveyard aesthetics, such as Mark Akenside's objections against supernaturalism in an excerpt of The Pleasures of Imagination (1744) and Elizabeth Carter's cogent attack on the "Discontent ...
Robin Dix suggests that Mark Akenside's poetry hints toward his insights as a doctor.
The literary career of Mark Akenside, including an edition of his non-medical prose.
Mee illustrates how Shaftesbury's disciplined enthusiasm structured sentimental novels by writers like Henry Mackenzie and the verse of "Shaftesburian poets" like Mark Akenside and James Thomson.
Moreover, if Dupre chooses to focus on eighteenth-century aesthetic theories, particularly those based on expressivity, the absence of John Dennis or Mark Akenside is difficult to justify.
In 1774 Mark Akenside published a poem entitled "The Pleasures of Imagination," which put forward some radical ideas about poetry and originality.
This quotation, along with the place and date of composition, support the conclusion that 'M.A.' was Mark Akenside.(1)
Other Gentleman's Magazine discoveries included 'Corinna', who was runner-up in the 1735 epigram competition with a poem entitled 'On a Gentleman whose Thigh was put out of joint, by a Young Lady whom he attempted to kiss, as she was playing on her Spinet', and the adolescent Mark Akenside, whose subsequent career might, indeed, be said to represent a triumph for the kind of dissenting, provincial talent fostered by Cave.
A fourth book was added later, and the whole poem was extensively revised, finally appearing posthumously in The Poems of Mark Akenside, M.D.