market economy

(redirected from Market capitalism)
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Related to Market capitalism: market capitalisation, Free market economy

market economy

an economic system in which production and allocation are determined mainly by decisions in competitive markets, rather than controlled by the STATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the same day of this letter, it reported that a company was donating $100 million -- thank you, free market capitalism -- to the Ronald McDonald House, which is also a result of free market capitalism.
The model is a unique blend of free market capitalism and social benefits funded by voluntary, generous taxpayers and administered by the government for the benefits of all citizens.
Kolozi provides a fascinating discussion of the neoconservatives and their disdain for market capitalism. Irving Kristol once famously claimed he never read F.
NRMCA frames an argument rooted in Market Capitalism: Federal funding should not advance the use of particular wood products over other construction materials or artificially provide preference for any building materials.
doesn't navigate the reality of depleted and limited resources--much of it directly attributable to free market capitalism, greed, and consumption--is not satisfactory.
In "American Capitalism at Sunset," Meckling and Gleason noted that there's "no good reason that the health of capitalism should be identified with the success of businessmen in tapping the political process," because free market capitalism and crony capitalism are not the same thing.
Even China has started to recognise this by adopting a form of state controlled market capitalism.
Polman were not caused by "free market capitalism;" "free market capitalism" has done more to enrich the lives of billions of people worldwide than any other force in history.
It was also refreshing to realise that free market capitalism has passed away.
A member of the European Parliament and former Hungarian finance minister, Bokros (economics and public policy, Central European U., Budapest) defends market capitalism and liberal democracy without denying their failures, shortcomings and imperfections, or taking their triumph for granted.
He argued instead for "a model that embraces the financial disciplines of market capitalism, but also provides opportunity and support for the vulnerable, the dispossessed and the downright unfortunate ...
It is a tough fight but one which all of us must engage if we have any hope of retaining the wealth producing power of free market capitalism.