market economy

(redirected from Market society)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.
Related to Market society: market economy

market economy

an economic system in which production and allocation are determined mainly by decisions in competitive markets, rather than controlled by the STATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Vision of a Real Free Market Society isn't the discussion that happens in the seminar room.
"A market economy is a tool, a valuable and effective tool for organising productive activity, but a market society is a place where everything is up for sale.
But in a market society characterized by expansive and intrusive commercialization, inequality takes on an altogether more pernicious significance; when it is the ability to pay that determines access to medical care, nonfailing schools, safe neighborhoods, or political influence, then the social fabric is torn.
Then, in part three of the book, the authors explore the theme of 'living in market society'.
Finally, we note the existence of a new and rising ruling class in our market society. NGOs are the new power structure or institution: They are staffed by intellectual leftists (academics and law school graduates primarily) who offer to mediate the relationship of corporations with one another and government as well as all other institutions.
Comentale offers something more sanguine (if less likely) in his argument that the modernists we've celebrated actually affirm capitalism, while the modernists we've overlooked offer a constructive alternative to market society.
Creating criminals : prisons and people in a market society. Vivien Stem.
Q: Which traits of our hunter-gatherer brains enable market society?
Just the reverse: He carried the day with the argument that, by itself, individual ownership in a dynamic market society did not suffice to guarantee all citizens freedom from want and fear in their old age, let alone the freedom to live apart from their children if they chose.
After all, we live in a free market society; and if a buyer is willing to pay an asking price, then the price isn't inflated.
Many, he claimed, say 'yes' to a market economy, but 'no' to a market society. There was often talk of new values to confront new situations but, he declared, 'Values don't need to be re-invented.
In addressing what he calls "the construction of a market society" (p.