market economy

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market economy

an economic system in which production and allocation are determined mainly by decisions in competitive markets, rather than controlled by the STATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
frequency of bidding for different pieces of market system development work over time.
Zimbabwe's Industry and Commerce minister, Nqobizitha Mangaliso Ndlovu, has criticised some private firms in the nation for trying to derail the success of the interbank forex market system.
The Kadiwa market system enabled the public to buy goods at cheaper rates and the farmers to sell their crops without having to worry about transport costs.
THE SEC'S APPROACH TO FACILITATING A NATIONAL MARKET SYSTEM
He offers three examples of this: climate change and global warming ("carbon dioxide as a harmful gas generating external costs across geographic borders"); financial markets ("a banking crisis where the system reaches its limits before collapsing and requiring a government bail-out"); and public goods and the free-rider problem ("the market system has no mechanism for creating public goods").
"The private market system has never performed in the way its protagonists suggest.
Just as the market system continually invades the political system, so the political system invades the market system.
Its stock trades on the Nasdaq National Market System under the symbol ARXX and is included in the S&P SmallCap 600 index.
EUROPEAN Union (EU) agriculture Commissioner Mariann Fischer Boel has highlighted yet another decision to distil quality European wine as evidence of the need to reform the EU's antiquated wine market system. Brussels has ordered that up to 185,000 hl of quality Spanish wine should go into subsidised crisis distillation, at a fixed price of Euro 3 per percentage alcohol content per hl of distilled wine.
"The importance of non-issuers to our capital market system cannot be overstated," said Barry C.
The New Market system, which was established in 2000, has tighter corporate governance requirements in line with international standards.
The two opponents reflect a wider European debate on how far to go in embracing the free market system and how much welfare an E.U.