markup language

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markup language

[′märk‚əp ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A set of rules and procedures for markup.

markup language

A set of labels that are embedded within text to distinguish individual elements or groups of elements for display or identification purposes. The labels are typically known as "tags."

For rendering (displaying and printing), markup languages indicate where font and other layout changes start and stop. For content identification, markup languages turn a text document into the equivalent of a database record in which individual data elements can be located for processing. In a database, elements are placed in a predefined structure. In a document, data elements reside in a freeform structure like text and must be identified with tags that mark their beginning and end.

It All Started with SGML
SGML is the granddaddy markup language that served as the foundation for HTML and XML. HTML is used for rendering the document, and XML is used for identifying the content of the document. See XML vocabulary, microformat, SGML, HTML and XML.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are variants like BPEL (business process execution language), the XTML (extensible telephony markup language) and dozens of others.
UnitsML has been designed to be a component for inclusion into other markup languages. There are several different ways to incorporate UnitsML into other markup languages.
The 13 papers comprising this proceedings for the second International Conference on Rules and Rule Markup Languages (Georgia, 2006) address both academic and industrial topics of interest to researchers and professionals working with rules for the semantic web.
Extrapolating the definition of markup, markup languages are those that allow us to create documents consisting of plaint ext data and other entities, plus markup codes that define the logical components and structure, as well as describe the appearance or other aspects of the data.
will very likely incorporate VoiceXML into its Speech Interface Framework; for copyright reasons the standard will be known as the W3C Dialog markup language. A standard is expected by next summer.
Extensible markup language (XML) may still be an unfamiliar computer language to many, but it's not science fiction and it's readily understandable by anyone who understands the Web.
Because SGML is complex, hard to learn, and has expensive software, alternative markup languages were developed.
A groundswell in the library community moved to explore how SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) conformant records could be used for content designation of document types beyond bibliographic records and to find relationships between the SGML and MARC bibliographic records in library catalogs.
The use of extensible markup language (XML) meets these goals admirably.
These formats include PDF, tagged image format (TIF), standard generalized markup language (SGML), hypertext markup language (HTML), and extensible markup language (XML).