Marozia


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Marozia

(mərō`zhēə, Ital. märô`tsyä), c.892–c.937, Italian noblewoman. Daughter of the Roman consul Theophylact and his wife Theodora, Marozia was strongly influenced by her mother who controlled Roman politics and the papacy in what has been called the "pornocracy." The mistress of Pope Sergius III (904–11), Marozia married, in succession, Albert I of Spoleto (d. 926), Guido of Tuscany (d. 929), and Hugh of Provence, to help maintain her political control. Marozia received the titles "senatrix" and "patricia" from Pope John X (914–28); she nevertheless had him put to death in 928 in order to install her favorite candidates in papal office (including one of her sons as Pope John XI; 931–35). In 932, Marozia was overthrown by Albert II of Spoleto, a son of her first marriage, who had her imprisoned until her death.
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Order number 1 2 3 4 5 Memory Diomira Isidora Zaira Zora Maurilia Desire Dorotei Anastasia Despina Fedora Zobaida Signs Tamara Zirma Zoe Hipacia Olivia Thin Isaura Zenobia Armila Sofroni Octavia Trading Eufemia Cloe Eutrop Ersilia Esmeraldina Eyes Valdrada Zemerude Bauci Filias Moriana Name Aglaura Leandra Pirra Clarice Irene Dead Melania Adelma Eusapia Argia Laudomia Sky Eudoxia Barsabeia Tecla Perinthia Andria Conti- nuous Leonia Trude Procopia Cecilia Pentesileia Hidden Olinda Raissa Marozia Teodora Berenice Some of them have an indivisible existence whilst others contain contradictions, some are more ethereal and others much more tangible, but all of them are real in the imagination and only inhabit an abstract space.
95), Marozia, matriarca de la familia noble de los condes de Tuscolo, una de las facciones que luchaba por el dominio de Roma y de su obispo, fue acusada de ser la amante del Papa Sergio III (904-911) desde la edad de quince anos, con quien habria engendrado al futuro Papa Juan XI (931-935); los historiadores han demostrado que en realidad Juan era su hijo, atribuido al duque de Espoleto, Alberico I, esposo de Marozia (Rendina, 2013, p.
E il momento di svolta: come nella trasfigurazione di una citta calviniana (Marozia tra le altre), la nevicata rivela per una breve frazione temporale il Raccordo Anulare come il luogo di un'identita che si puo rivelare attraverso l'immagine del suo vuoto, inducendo cosi all'ascolto di chi lo abita.26
IT IS said two noble ladies called Theodora and Marozia ruled the papacy of the 10th century, and that it was Theodora who created John X.
Eventually Rome became controlled by the tyrannical Roman and barbaric Lombard families who dominated Italy and the papacy, the most shameful being the rule of the Roman matron Marozia, concubine of popes Sergius III and John X, whose son became Pope John XI.
He is out of the Storm Bird mare Marozia, who won a Lingfield 1m4f handicap for John Gosden and Sheikh Mohammed.
Solo Clarissa, procedendo nella lettura del manoscritto D.U., comincia confusamente a percepire la natura metanarrativa della realta stessa; cio la portera ad entrare in simbiosi con Marozia, il suo alter ego, e questo le causera notevoli problemi in seguito.
Browning relies here on an offshoot of research by his father into the history of the Roman senatrix Marozia and her family's influence on the papacy.
Two extraordinary women ruled both the city and the papacy, Theodora and her daughter Marozia, the probable model for the later legend of Pope Joan.
Then Theophylact's daughter Marozia took over the family business.
The cadaver synod does not sound like a suitable scene for a child of 6, but Marozia, no ordinary kid, would go on to be "granddaughter of one pope, mistress of a second, the mother of a third, the aunt of a fourth and the grandmother of a fifth."
Zizola recalls the almost incredible trajectory of the frequently-tumultuous line of Roman bishops - some saints, some scoundrels, many worthy, countless mediocre, a series of 11th-century young scamps appointed by the dowager Marozia, along with great medieval pontiffs from Gregory I and the monk Hildebrand as Gregory VII to Innocent III and Eugene IV - before describing the magnificent as well as scandalous accomplishments of the renaissance pontiffs and winding down with an account of the extraordinary 20th-century popes.