Marranos


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Marranos

(mərä`nōs): see SephardimSephardim
, one of the two major geographic divisions of the Jewish people, consisting of those Jews whose forebears in the Middle Ages resided in the Iberian Peninsula, as distinguished from those who lived in Germanic lands, who came to be known as the Ashkenazim (see
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.

Marranos

 

in medieval Spain and Portugal, Jews who officially converted to Christianity.

The number of converts increased in the 14th and 15th centuries (especially after the Royal Edict of 1492, which required that all Jews either adopt Catholicism in three months or leave Spain; about 50,000, attested to in various sources, adopted Christianity). They were an isolated group within the population. The Marranos engaged in trade, tax collecting, and state service. Their wealth aroused the envy of the feudal lords and the clergy. The Marranos were persecuted by the Inquisition, which accused them of secretly adhering to their former faith.

References in periodicals archive ?
Marrano Poets of the Seventeenth Century: An Anthology of the Poetry of Joao Pinto Delgado, Antonio Enriquez Gomez, and Miguel de Barrios.
If the military and evangelization methods of conquest used in Al-Andalus to achieve genocide and epistemicide were extrapolated to the conquest of indigenous people in the Americas, the conquest of the Americas also created a new racial imaginary and racial hierarchy that transformed the conquest of Moriscos and Marranos in 16th century Iberian Peninsula.
Marranos, Yovel suggests, were integral in Renaissance Spain's interiorized religion, such as that of St.
Indeed, Yovel's thematic thread of "The Other Within" permeates this study and coalesces into his conclusion that it is the Marranos who have played one of the most unique roles in the development of the modern Spanish identity.
A number of scholars have argued that Spinoza's skeptical views were cryptic, that Spinoza employed a sort of "dual language" in typical Marrano style.
6) Otra vez, el hecho de que la comunidad judia en la cual Spinoza fue educado haya sido formada por los primeros Marranos, jugo un papel crucial.
The term Marrani has uncertain origins (XV century), and maybe it was acquired from the Spanish term marrano (young pig), according to some scholars taken from the Arabic term muharram (forbidden thing).
THE TRUST has recently added a new name to the list, and it is, at first blush, a complete shocker: Amelia Bassano Lanier, the dark-skinned, illegitimate daughter of an Elizabethan court musician, a Marrano (i.
Another prominent Marrano was a Jewish merchant from Venice who was in the London area in 1596-1600, just in that half-decade that The Merchant of Venice was written and performed.
Schoenfeld, her severe but compelling teacher, explained that Spinoza was the child of Marranos, Spanish Jews forced by the Inquisition to convert to Christianity, who nevertheless continued to practice Judaism in secret despite the death that surely would ensue were the authorities to suspect them of obeying the Torah, or Jewish law.
De un modo especifico, esta novela es una reconstitucion de escena de la dolorosa realidad de los marranos en el Nuevo Mundo.
In the first place, the resettlement began not with avowed Jews but with marranos [here the author means crypto-Jews], who were fleeing the Iberian Peninsula.