family therapy

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family therapy

[¦fam·i·lē ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Treatment of more than one family member in the same therapeutic session.

family therapy

a treatment, usually for disturbed children, employing PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC or COUNSELLING methods, based on the premise that a child's behaviour is the product of a complex of interacting family relationships. To understand why a child is unhappy or exhibiting behaviour problems it is essential that he or she is regarded as part of the family system, therefore the whole family is seen by the therapist. By being able to assess where the stresses are within the family, the therapist is able to suggest ways in which the balance may be restored. The ‘problem’ behaviour may be ‘referred’ from another part of the family system (e.g. when the parents are not happy in their marital relationship), and, similarly, it will be affecting the rest of the family system. Adjustment to one part of the system will have repercussions on other parts, therefore the whole family is involved in the treatment process (see SYSTEMS THEORY for the theoretical concepts involved).
References in periodicals archive ?
Training and supervision in Marriage and Family Therapy: A national survey.
In some cases, the degree program will have included some training in marriage and family therapy. In others, it will not.
With the recent growth of medical marriage and family therapy internships, more clinicians are receiving training about how to better collaborate with other health care providers.
Pioneers such as Salvador Minuchin, Carl Whitaker, and Murray Bowen expanded upon their psychiatric training to develop what we now know as marriage and family therapy. Marriage and family therapy (MFT) is rooted in systems theory where families are viewed as "a system of interconnected parts" (Guttman, 1991, p.43).
In response to this predicament, Odell and Campbell offer The Practical Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy as a useful daily guide for graduate students and beginning marriage and family therapists that will ease the transition from learner to practicing professional in the clinical domain.
This introductory text outlines the history and practice of marriage and family therapy. In 16 chapters, family therapy specialists from the US detail the foundations of marriage and family therapy, including general systems theory and cybernetics, and contextual issues like gender, sexual orientation, culture, and spirituality; seven theoretical models of the field (structural, strategic, Milan, collaborative language-based models, experiential, transgenerational, and cognitive-behavioral family therapy); and specific treatment areas, such as couple therapy, sex therapy, communication training, marriage enrichment, premarital therapy, mental illness, physical illness, substance abuse, family violence, divorce, research, ethics, and legal and professional issues.
Born in Spain, Miriam Torres moved to the United States in 2007 and since then has completed her Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy. She has been a parent educator for more than two years and offers parent consultation for behavior management and courses on parenting.
Stith (marriage and family therapy, Kansas State U.) et al.
Coverage encompasses the history and development of the field, first-generation, systemic, and postmodern models of marriage and family therapy, and processes and outcomes in marriage and family therapy.
Trained in systemic family therapy approaches and a graduate of Nova Southeastern University's Marriage and Family Therapy program, Jacobson practices what's known as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT), which research suggests has the potential to create lasting, positive change in a relationship in just a few sessions compared to other traditional forms of therapy—typically fewer than ten.
Editors Rastogi (clinical psychology, Argosy U.) and Thomas (marriage and family therapy, Purdue U.) have enlisted the help from colleagues around the world in dealing with such issues as establishing a context for race relations, specific challenges with Muslim couples, emotionally focused therapy approaches and strategic family counseling.