Marsala


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Marsala

(märsä`lä), city (1991 pop. 80,177), W Sicily, Italy, a port on the Mediterranean Sea, located on Cape Boeo. It is noted for its sweet wine. The ancient LilybaeumLilybaeum
, ancient city of Sicily, on the extreme western coast. It is the modern Marsala. It was founded (396 B.C.) by Carthage and became a stronghold. In the First Punic War it resisted a long Roman siege (250–242 B.C.). Rome finally won (241 B.C.
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, it was later renamed Marsah al Allah [port of God] by the Arabs. In 1860, Garibaldi landed there at the start of his successful campaign to conquer the kingdom of the Two Sicilies.

Marsala

 

a city and port in Italy on the western coast of Sicily, in the province of Trapani. Population, 82,700 (1968). Marsala is a wine-making center (producing the dessert wine Marsala) and center of the fishing industry. There is flour milling, macaroni production, and cork processing. Wine, fruit, vegetables, sea salt, and tuff are exported.


Marsala

 

a strong grape dessert wine containing 16-20 percent alcohol and 3-16 percent sugar. Marsala tastes like Madeira, but it is sweeter. The wine has been made for a long time in Sicily near the city of Marsala. It is distinguished by its tarry flavor, which was derived from the tarred casks in which it was transported in the hold of ships. This tarry flavor is now achieved by adding thoroughly boiled must. The best Soviet Marsala has an alcoholic content of 18 percent and a sugar content of 7 percent and is made in the Turkmen SSR from Terbash and Kara Uzium grapes. The wine is aged at least three years.

Marsala

a sweet, amber wine made in Sicily. [Ital. Hist.: NCE, 2990]
See: Wine

Marsala

1. a port in W Sicily: landing place of Garibaldi at the start of his Sicilian campaign (1860). Pop.: 77 784 (2001)
2. a dark sweet dessert wine made in Sicily
References in periodicals archive ?
GINO SAYS: 'I came up with this recipe because some friends told me they were watching their weight, but they loved my Pollo al Marsala dish and wished they could have a similar recipe without the cream.
Marsala hadn't specified what he wanted deleted from his server but just said on the experts' forum that the code erased everything, The Independent reported without mentioning where the company is based.
"I am thrilled to be recognized for my accomplishments in such a competitive industry," Marsala explained.
Pantone licensee Sephora, for example, continues to merchandise Marsala and 2014's Color of the Year, Radiant Orchid.
Kling said some colors have a mysterious quality "one can't quite identify -- and Marsala is one of them.
Consumers will have plenty of Marsala items to feast on this year, as these and many other products hit the marketplace.
No, they're not the top three words used on a dating website, but the three used to describe Marsala - the Pantone Colour of the Year 2015.
If you don't 'do' colour, how about this cute retro clock, with a subtle trim in rich Marsala? Jones Red Retro Tornado Wall Clock, PS20, BHS
The vote is in and the winner of Pantone's 2015 Color of the Year is Marsala. "Much like the fortified wine that gives Marsala (Pantone 18-1438) its name, this tasteful hue embodies the satisfying richness of a fulfilling meal, while its grounding red-brown roots emanate a sophisticated, natural earthiness," said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.
Thus, Pantone, an X-Rite company and the recognized global color authority, has announced Pantone 18-1438 Marsala, "a naturally robust and earthy wine red," as the Color of the Year for 2015.
According to employee benefit attorneys Michael Del Conte of the Groom Law Group in Washington, D.C., and Gina Marsala from Mercer, in the San Francisco Bay area, the combination of electronic communication and "auto" features poses no great problems for retirement plan sponsors yet, but the possibility of a plan sponsor running afoul of the law is still on the radar, making the observance of best practices the sponsor's wisest course.
Martin Marsala, M.D., professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, with colleagues at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, and in Slovakia, the Czech Republic and The Netherlands, said grafting neural stem cells derived from a human fetal spinal cord to the rats' spinal injury site produced an array of therapeutic benefits--from less muscle spasticity to new connections between the injected stem cells and surviving host neurons.