Marshalsea


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Related to Marshalsea: Little Dorrit, Marshalsea Court

Marshalsea

ancient London prison, long used for incarcerating debtors. [Br. Hist.: Benét, 640]
References in periodicals archive ?
Little Dorrit is a name with a literary burden, and so is Marshalsea, the old debtors' prison.
She suffers throughout all the years of the Marshalsea, becoming a "fountain of love and fidelity" to her family and to others about her, like the mentally disabled and penniless Maggy and the destitute old pensioner, Nandy (192).
on the green earth"; (24) in Little Dorrit (1855-1857), the narrator's repeated references to Judgment that accompany Arthur Clennam's penitential growth in the Marshalsea prison; in Villette (1853), Lucy Snowe's desperate search for consolation that leads her to dabble in Catholic practices like confession and to consider the allure of purgatory.
William Dorrit and his family are on a tour of Europe to forget the many years spent in the debt prison of Marshalsea, out of which the old gentleman bought his way after discovering he was the lost heir to a large fortune.
When Arthur Clennam, recognizably a gentleman, attempts to discover the nature of the debt that is keeping William Dorrit in Marshalsea Prison, he is referred to the Circumlocution Office.
A fellmonger was arrested, and under the pretext of attending a play, a group of his fellow fellmongers gathered in order to free him from Marshalsea Prison.
When Dickens was young, his father and entire family except for himself were thrown into Marshalsea debtors' prison.
For Charles, this occurred at age 12 when his father was arrested for debt and sentenced to the Marshalsea, an ancient for-profit prison where debtors were forced to pay for their own stay while gathering resources through day jobs, family, and friends to pay down their debt.
See also The Case of the Marshalsea (1612) 10 Co Rep 68b, 73a; 77 ER 1027, 1033 (Coke CJ).
(54) Having been born in the Marshalsea debtors' gaol, in which her father has been imprisoned for two decades, Amy has spent her entire life calling the prison home.
En la toma de la Bastilla, obviamente, Dickens se comprometio, tambien, con el impulso de la sublimacion: demolido el simbolo de todas las carceles, todas las otras carceles, vulnerables, se derrumbarian, empezando por aquella en que peno, por deudas, su propio padre, Marshalsea. Eso lo ve bien Peter Ackroyd en su gran Dickens (1990).
Googling a runner Amy Dorrit 3.25 Salisbury The central character in Charles Dickens' novel Little Dorrit, Amy Dorrit is brought up in the debtors' prison, the Marshalsea, until her family is released after inheriting a large estate.