deferred gratification

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deferred gratification

the conscious postponement of immediate emotional satisfaction in order to achieve longer-term goals. Such an orientation to longer-term goals is, for example, sometimes seen as an important dimension of educational achievement (see Bernstein, 1971).
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, one of the main takeaways of the Marshmallow Test and itsfindings is that it is possible to re-learn willpower as an adult.
Mischel is most widely known for his breakthrough "marshmallow test" which was designed to assess delayed gratification in children--would a preschool child choose to eat one marshmallow immediately or wait from 10 to 20 minutes to receive a better reward of two marshmallows?
The famous marshmallow test that predicts future success, based on which kids can resist an immediate treat?
Somewhere along that long and shallow trajectory someone may have said," "You must have done really well on the marshmallow test."
In what became known as "the marshmallow test," a child was placed in a room with a treat and presented with a choice.
Behavioral variables are also implicated, such as one relating to the famous "marshmallow test."
The Marshmallow Test: a Landmark study on self control: During 1960s Walter Mischel and his colleagues began a study with preschoolers at Stanford University.
Somewhere along that long and shallow trajectory someone may have said, "You must have done really well on the marshmallow test."
As (http://news.gsu.edu/2018/02/08/chimpanzee-self-control-related-intelligence-georgia-state-study-finds/) Georgia State University points out, the test is related to a famous experiment called the "marshmallow test" in which children chose between taking a single marshmallow in front of them or waiting to have two marshmallows later on.
While 'The Marshmallow Test' may be over half a century old, it seems that parents are applying an adaptation of it in their daily lives even today.
Could the Marshmallow Test Be the New Credit Score?, PSYCHOL.
He drew comparisons from a 1960's psychology study conducted by Stanford University known as the marshmallow test, where children were offered a treat now or two treats if they were prepared to wait.