deferred gratification

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deferred gratification

the conscious postponement of immediate emotional satisfaction in order to achieve longer-term goals. Such an orientation to longer-term goals is, for example, sometimes seen as an important dimension of educational achievement (see Bernstein, 1971).
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequent 'Marshmallow Experiment' studies changed the rules.
I came across this term while reading The Marshmallow Experiment, which looked at self-control and the effects it has on various aspects of life.
This reminds me of the Stanford marshmallow experiment. In a series of studies, a child was offered a choice between a marshmallow, a cookie or a pretzel or two such rewards if they wait for a short period, approximately 15 minutes, during which the tester left the room and then returned.
Temptations are by definition hard to resist, but for those who manage to delay gratification for any period of time can expect superior financial outcomes than those who are not able to as the Stanford Marshmallow Experiment demonstrated.
Psychologist Walter Mischel proved the ability of delayed gratification contributes to one's success later in life, in his (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_marshmallow_experiment) marshmallow experiment
In the '60s, Stanford professor Walter Mischel conducted a study that would eventually be known as the marshmallow experiment. This would become one of the key principles in emotional intelligence or EQ (quotient), the delayed gratification principle.
The video is modeled after the Stanford University marshmallow experiment, a series of studies on delayed gratification where a child is offered a small reward up front, or a bigger one if they wait 15 minutes.
There's work like Annie's Homegrown, which spoofs the Stanford marshmallow experiment that began in the late 1960s, using kids and delayed gratification to sell the brand's mac and cheese pizza, The 3-year-old shop also recently launched Gallo's New Amsterdam vodka, and for client Do.com created a short film in which a nursing home resident has 17 minutes to Live and organizes his farewell party via the site.
Not eating the marshmallow in the context of the marshmallow experiment is the highest form, but this is already okay because, as Lomborg claims, we are much better than a decade ago.