Marsilea


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Related to Marsilea: Marsilea quadrifolia

Marsilea

 

a genus of plants of the family Marsiliaceae of the class Filicineae. They are rhizomatous grasses growing usually in shallow water or wet, marshy areas that occasionaly dry up. Numerous roots grow below the rhizome, and two rows of leaves form on top. The young leaves are spirally convolute; the more developed leaves have four approximate pinnae on a long stem. There are between 60 and 70 species found throughout the world, particularly in Australia and southern Africa. Three species are found in the USSR, growing in the Lower Volga Region, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia. The most common is the clover fern Marsilea quadrifolia.

REFERENCE

Takhtadzhyan, A. L. Vysshie rasteniia, vol. 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
This may be the reason for the prevalence of AM fungal colonization in both the Marsilea species observed from marshy habitats.
Another Hawaiian fern, the aquatic Marsilea villosa, has been hypothesized to be of North American ancestry.
Relationship between nuclear ultrastructure and heteroblastic development in Marsilea vestita.
Systematics of the New World species of Marsilea (Marsileaceae).
From European priority species to invasive weed: Marsilea azorica (Marsileaceae) is a misidentified alien.
used in the same sense in Marsilea by Mizukami and Gall (1966), Bell
Thus, it is here designated as the lectotype for the name Marsilea quadrifolia.
The impetus for this study was an applied resource management need to clarify the identity of three western North American species of Marsilea in Florida (Jacono and Johnson, 2006).
A substantial body of experimental work has investigated the control of dormancy and apical dominance in Marsilea (e.
Leaf characteristics and photosynthetic performance of floating, emergent and terrestrial leaves of Marsilea quadrifolia.
Marsilea mutica is native to tropical areas of Australia and New Caledonia.
The presence of vessel elements was documented in genera such as Pteridium, Selaginella, Equisetum and Marsilea and consisted of cells with scalariform to simple perforation plates (Duerden, 1940; Bierhorst, 1958; White, 1960).