Marston Moor


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Marston Moor,

battlefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, N England, near York. The battle fought there on July 2, 1644, between the royalists, under Prince Rupert and the duke of Newcastle, and the parliamentarians, under Lord Fairfax of Cameron, Oliver Cromwell, and the earl of Leven, resulted in the first major victory for the parliamentarians in the English civil warEnglish civil war,
1642–48, the conflict between King Charles I of England and a large body of his subjects, generally called the "parliamentarians," that culminated in the defeat and execution of the king and the establishment of a republican commonwealth.
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Marston Moor

 

an area 11 km west of York in Great Britain where, on July 2, 1644, during the English Bourgeois Revolution of the 17th century, a battle of the first civil war (1642-46) took place.

At Marston Moor the Royalists (17,000 men), commanded by Prince Rupert, suffered their first major defeat at the hands of the Anglo-Scotch Parliamentary Army (27,000 men), commanded by the Earl of Manchester. Royalist losses were 6,000 men and 25 guns, whereas the Parliamentary troops lost 1,500 men. The cavalry of the Parliamentary Army under the command of O. Cromwell played the decisive part in the battle.

Marston Moor

deciding battle of British Civil War (1644). [Br. Hist.: Harbottle, 154]

Marston Moor

a flat low-lying area in NE England, west of York: scene of a battle (1644) in which the Parliamentarians defeated the Royalists
References in periodicals archive ?
AT Wetherby, Jumbo Wilkinson's 25 to 1 chance Armagret (D Byrne) unbelievably turns over Josh Gifford's 1993 Champion Chaser Deep Sensation (D Murphy) in the Marston Moor Chase.
The dead and the maimed didn't get up laughing after the original battles of Naseby or Marston Moor, and the way that carnage has now been turned into a form of entertainment seems tasteless in the extreme.
Principal battles: Edgehill (near Banbury) (1642); Roundway Down (near Devizes), Newbury I (1643); Marston Moor (1644).
As commander of the famous cavalry regiment called Iron - sides, Cromwell contributed to the Parliamentary victories at Edgehill and Marston Moor and, as joint commander of the New Model Army, defeated the Royalists at Naseby.
Rashly he came out again to fight at Marston Moor on July 2 and got beaten, badly.
They visit an establishment believed to have been drunk dry by troops the night before the Battle of Marston Moor during the English Civil War, while in York they learn about a pub that once doubled up as a hospital and has a gruesome history.
Phil will talk about the locally-raised units of horse and foot, the main engagements, including the skirmishes and battles at Piercebridge, Yarm/Egglescliffe and Guisborough in 1642/43 and the later bloody sieges of Scarborough and Newcastle following the "turning of the tide" in the war with the Battle of Marston Moor near York.
1644: The Battle of Marston Moor took place, in which Oliver Cromwell's Roundheads defeated Prince Rupert's Cavaliers and left 3,0 dead.
"Marston Moor has shown he has ability with his work in the mornings and we decided to take a chance with him.
But he was to lose everything after leading the Royalists to defeat in the battle of Marston Moor in 1644, the turning point of the Civil War.
The latter means you can play out parts of the battles of Dunbar and Marston Moor from the English Civil War, the battles of Mook and Newport from the Dutch War of Independence, the battles of Wittstock and Breitenfeld from the Thirty Years War and others.