Martianus Capella


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Martianus Capella:

see Capella, MartianusCapella, Martianus
, fl. 5th cent.?, Latin writer, b. Carthage. His one famous work, The Marriage of Mercury and Philology, also called the Satyricon and Disciplinae, is a long allegory about the liberal arts. Its popularity in medieval schools was universal.
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Capella, Martianus

(märshēā`nəs kəpĕl`ə), fl. 5th cent.?, Latin writer, b. Carthage. His one famous work, The Marriage of Mercury and Philology, also called the Satyricon and Disciplinae, is a long allegory about the liberal arts. Its popularity in medieval schools was universal. The author is also known as Felix Capella and may have lived in the 4th cent.
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XVII, no contexto da Reforma protestante) as mais remotas (de que e exemplo o estudo de Faustina Doufikar-Aerts sobre a narrativa deuterocanonica de Susana), com dois importantes grupos de textos dedicados aos ecos das Metamorphoses de Apuleio em diferentes momentos da Cultura Europeia--entre os quais se distinguem os contributos de Beatrice Bakhouche ("Martianus Capella's De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii or the subversion of the Latin Novel", pp.
Teeuwen, Mariken and Sinead O'Sullivan, eds, Carolingian Scholarship and Martianus Capella: Ninth-Century Commentary Traditions on 'De nuptiis' in Context (Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, 12), Brepols, Turnhout, 2011; hardback; pp.
This subset of speculative writers, including such early figures as Macrobius and Martianus Capella from the early fifth century, often brings together ideas concerning music that are mutually contradictory or that their authors simply misunderstood.
One example is the expression inter ignitos lapides ambulare (to walk among burning stones)--a wink to Heinsius's daring erotic themes--which does not primarily refer to a locus in Martianus Capella on the gems in the crown of Juno (pp.
Essay 2 compares monosemy, polysemy, and ontology in Plato's Cratylus with Eriugena's and Anselm's assimilations of Plato's doctrines mediated through Calcidius, Macrobius, Martianus Capella, Boethius, and Augustine, and it terminates with insights of Hugh of St.
Martianus Capella drew the allegory of grammar as an old woman, punishing and mysterious; she carried a box in which she held knives and other tools to prune the errors from her students.
Early medieval texts that did treat cosmological and astrological matters such as Macrobius' commentary on the Dream of Scipio or Martianus Capella's On the Marriage of Mercury and Philology, had acquired their information secondhand and treated it allegorically.
In The Nuptials of Philology and Mercury, Martianus Capella, a rhetorician from Carthage, draws a nice allegorical picture of the seven liberal arts, which made his work highly attractive to the Middle Ages.
7, a two line epigram, written on a flyleaf, which follows an unsigned letter to a certain Winibert (probably Abbot of Schuttern) asking for the loan of a copy of Martianus Capella's De nuptiis.
This is I think an important insight, and leads to new and persuasive interpretation of works such as Martianus Capella's De Nuptiis, where comic potential is plausibly detected.
Martianus Capella speaks of two, the Erythraean and the Phrygian; Aelian of four, the Erythraean, Samian, Egyptian, and Sardian.