Martianus Capella


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Martianus Capella:

see Capella, MartianusCapella, Martianus
, fl. 5th cent.?, Latin writer, b. Carthage. His one famous work, The Marriage of Mercury and Philology, also called the Satyricon and Disciplinae, is a long allegory about the liberal arts. Its popularity in medieval schools was universal.
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Capella, Martianus

(märshēā`nəs kəpĕl`ə), fl. 5th cent.?, Latin writer, b. Carthage. His one famous work, The Marriage of Mercury and Philology, also called the Satyricon and Disciplinae, is a long allegory about the liberal arts. Its popularity in medieval schools was universal. The author is also known as Felix Capella and may have lived in the 4th cent.
References in periodicals archive ?
One example is the expression inter ignitos lapides ambulare (to walk among burning stones)--a wink to Heinsius's daring erotic themes--which does not primarily refer to a locus in Martianus Capella on the gems in the crown of Juno (pp.
Shanzer, A Philosophical and Literary Commentary on Martianus Capella 's De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii Book I, Berkeley-Los AngelesLondon.
Westra-Kupke (1994-1998): The Berlin Commentary on Martianus Capella De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii, I, edited by H.
Ces principes de classification rappellent clairement ceux de Balbus (contemporain d'Hygin) et de Martianus Capella (trois siecles plus tard), comme on le verra infra.
Essay 5 examines Aristides Quintilianus' musical theories in light of his metaphysics, and his depiction of the human soul's ascent as likely echoing Porphyrian doctrines, as well as the utilization of the latter by Martianus Capella in his allegorical depictions of Neophythagorean themes.
Martianus Capella drew the allegory of grammar as an old woman, punishing and mysterious; she carried a box in which she held knives and other tools to prune the errors from her students.
In The Nuptials of Philology and Mercury, Martianus Capella, a rhetorician from Carthage, draws a nice allegorical picture of the seven liberal arts, which made his work highly attractive to the Middle Ages.
Martianus Capella speaks of two, the Erythraean and the Phrygian; Aelian of four, the Erythraean, Samian, Egyptian, and Sardian.
Kempshall makes half a dozen references to Gregory's Moralia, but he has almost totally ignored his highly rhetorical letters, composed by a pope who owed much to Cicero and Quintilian, as well as Martianus Capella.
Ovid's Metamorphoses is naturally enough the central focus, and the concept of metamorphosis and related terms is conscientiously traced from Martianus Capella to late sixteenth-century emblems.
Unfortunately, and somewhat unhelpfully, the early monuments of grammar and rhetoric--Aelius Donatus, Victorinus, Martianus Capella, Priscian, and Boethius--are then rather hastily covered.
The fifth-century Martianus Capella proved through geometry that the world was a sphere with two hemispheres.