Lyon, Mary

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Lyon, Mary

(lī`ən), 1797–1849, American educator, founder of Mt. Holyoke College, b. Buckland, Mass. She attended three academies in Massachusetts; later she taught at Ashfield, Mass., Londonderry, N.H., and Ipswich, Mass. Interested in promoting the higher education of women, she won the aid of several influential men and succeeded (1837) in establishing Mt. Holyoke Female Seminary (later Mt. Holyoke College) at South Hadley, Mass. She served as principal for 12 years, directing the development of a well-rounded college program and emphasizing the principle of service to others.

Bibliography

See biographies by E. Banning (1965) and E. A. Green (1979); M. F. Lansing, ed., Mary Lyon through Her Letters (1937).

Lyon, Mary

(1797–1849) educator; born in Buckland, Mass. After teaching in Massachusetts and New Hampshire seminaries, she was the planner and founding principal (1837–49) of the first permanent women's college in the U.S.A., Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (later College). Lyon modeled the curriculum on that of Amherst College, but hired only female permanent faculty.
References in periodicals archive ?
On 2 June 1903, at around 10pm, 12-year-old Mary Lyon returned to her home in Salisbury Street, Everton, after playing out.
In A Quiet Passion, for which Davies also wrote the screenplay, the filmmaker casts Dickinson as a rebel who as a girl (played by Emma Bell) boldly stands up to Holyoke Seminary's grim headmistress, Mary Lyon (Sara Vertongen).
They are Watson and the Shark; "Oh, Susanna;" "Mary Lyon, Massachusetts;" William Howard Taft's drawers; Josephine Baker's banana skirt; V-J Day, 1945, Times Square; the Kinsey Reports; The Quiet American; "That Touch of Mink;" the Immigration Reform Act of 1965; and president Jimmy Carter's inaugural address.
Mary Lyon's theory, now known as X inactivation, was proved correct and is fundamental to understanding many genetic diseases.
"Circle Mirror Transformation" is directed by Krisha Hoyt and features five local actors - Mary Helan Turner, Art Stoumbelis, Robert Hale, Angel Roy and Mary Lyon.
Some of the most important women who helped to spread female teacher education were prominent women-teachers such as Emma Willard, Catharine Beecher, Zilpah Grant, and Mary Lyon who had followed closely the development of Pestalozzi's methodology and used it in the curricula of their schools (Unger 2001, 843).
For example, Mary Lyon's mission transcended Mount Holyoke and her death in 1849.
Green (1979), in the introduction of her book, Mary Lyon and Mount Holyoke suggests that Mary Lyon, (the founder of Mount Holyoke woman's institution, Massachusettes, in 1835), "An obscure young teacher, without money, wealthy patrons, or influential friends, ...
When Mary Lyon first founded the female seminary in South Hadley, Massachusetts, her primary goal was to prepare women teachers to find respectable jobs so that they could change the world for the better.
Warren, the first dean of the Harvard Medical School), to education and health reformers (e.g., Mary Lyon, Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, Mary Gove Nichols, and Russell Trall), to purveyors of domestic advice (e.g., Lydia Maria Child and Catharine Beecher)--advanced gymnastics for U.S.