Mary of Modena


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Mary of Modena

(mŏd`ĭnə), 1658–1718, queen consort of James IIJames II,
1633–1701, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1685–88); second son of Charles I, brother and successor of Charles II. Early Life
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 of England; daughter of Alfonso IV, duke of Modena. Her marriage (1673) to James, then duke of York, was brought about through the influence of Louis XIV of France. Mary was a devout Roman Catholic and therefore unpopular in Protestant England. When she bore a son in 1688, it was widely rumored that this Catholic heir to the throne was a changeling, and fear of a Catholic succession precipitated the Glorious RevolutionGlorious Revolution,
in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of William III and Mary II to the English throne. It is also called the Bloodless Revolution.
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 that overthrew James II. Mary fled to France with her son, James Francis Edward StuartStuart or Stewart, James Francis Edward,
1688–1766, claimant to the British throne, son of James II and Mary of Modena; called the Old Pretender.
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, and worked tirelessly to advance his claims to the English throne (see JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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).
References in periodicals archive ?
The ring is thought to have belonged to Edward Colman, secretary of Mary of Modena, who was sisterin-law to King Charles II and wife to the future King James II.
And that was private compared to 1688, when some 42 eminent public figures were called into Mary Of Modena's bedroom at St James's Palace to verify the birth of King James II's son, James Stuart.
It is thought this practice began in 1688, when dozens of officials watched Mary of Modena, wife of James II, give birth to a son, to stamp out rumours that Mary was not really pregnant and that the baby was to be smuggled into the room in a bedpan.
The birth drew a huge crowd because many doubted that the King's wife Mary of Modena was really pregnant.
James II is known to have visited the well with his wife Mary of Modena during 1686 and Princess Victoria, staying in Holywell, visited the Well in 1828.
Ten years later, he appointed young Sarah a maid of honour to his second wife, Mary of Modena. If not as ravishing to look at as her sister, Sarah was considered attractive, with reddish-gold hair, blue eyes and a precociously well-developed figure.
Her book concludes with the popular literature dealing with the "birth" of a baby boy to Queen Mary of Modena, wife of James II, a fearful event to the Protestants.
The bed was certainly used by William III's cousin Prince Louis (Ludwig Wilhelm), Margrave of Baden-Baden, during a state visit in January and February 1694, when it still stood in the former Queen's (Mary of Modena's) apartment at Whitehall, thus further substantiating the possible connection with her marriage.
Charles (son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria of o James (son of James II and Mary of Modena): Created Prince of Wales c.
There seems to be nothing to record either of his marriages, first to Anne Hyde or his second wife Mary of Modena.
They were James II and Mary of Modena, who visited Holywell on 29 August 1686, when Mary of Modena offered to the shrine part of the shift worn by Mary Queen of Scots at her execution.
Most of them, being Jacobites, concentrated their energies on Mary of Modena who provided a strong emotional center, as mother, supporter of her husband, and exile, and as Barash points out, Mary II takes on a doubly unattractive role as the disrespectful daughter who takes away her father's crown and the overly accommodating wife who ban& it over to her husband (213).