Masjumi

Masjumi

 

(abbreviation for Majelis Sjuro Muslimin Indonesia, Consultative Council of Indonesian Muslims), the largest Muslim party in Indonesia from 1945 to 1960. Its program called for the creation in Indonesia of a state based on the principles of Islam.

The Masjumi Party represented the interests of the landowners and the commercial and money-lending bourgeoisie, although the peasantry constituted its mass base. The party’s leadership was dominated by the so-called religious socialists, who wanted to promote a rapid development of capitalism in Indonesia with the help of imperialist states and who favored a pro-Western foreign policy. In 1960 the party was disbanded by a decree of President Sukarno for participation in antigovernment rebellions, and the leaders involved in the uprisings were arrested. The Suharto government, which came to power in Indonesia in 1965-67, did not allow the reconstitution of the Masjumi Party, but its leaders were released from prison. Many former Masjumi members joined the Muslim Party of Indonesia, which was founded in 1968.

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The leader of the traditionalists in this action, Kyai Wahab Flasbullah, wrote a letter to the leaders of Masjumi threatening to initiate the exodus, and this letter came under scrutiny.
Remy Madinier, L'Indonesie, entre democratie musulmane et Islam integral: Histoire du parti Masjumi (1945-1960).
When by the end of the 1950s this political project failed, and the political party Masjumi, which had advocated application of Islamic law, fell from grace, its leader from 1949 to 1958, M.
Father: Kiyai Haji Wahid Hasjim (1913-1951), effective head of Masjumi (HESEA 2004:929-30).
Leaving aside the uncanny prefiguring of familiar elements in the worldwide Islamic revival of the present day, one could logically and quickly proceed to the post-World War II scene, where democratic politics in the independent Republic of Indonesia saw the rise of a distinct Islamic party in the shape of the Masjumi, led by the so-called santri element--in European terms perhaps best equated with 'middle-class Puritan', but with dominant accent on the devoutness, not the economic dynamism.
Modernization from the 1920s forward affected educated and urban Arabs and Muslims, such as teachers, clerks, shopkeepers, and industrial workers in particular, who often expressed concerns about their identity by joining such popular movements as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Jama'at-I Islami in Pakistan and India, and Masjumi in Indonesia.
At least four parties, for example, claimed to be the true successor to Masjumi, the main political vehicle of modernist Muslims in the 1950s.
27) And in the 1955 election, when voters had the option of choosing between parties representing religious programs, West Javanese voters showed a preference for the modernist Islamo-democratic party Masjumi.
in the last months of the constituent assemble before Sukarno dissolved it, the Masjumi had come to agree to drop its insistence on an Islamic state and was moving towards an area of compromise with non-Islamic parties, towards a kind of acceptance of Pantjasila, that given another six months should have eventuated in a successful constituent assembly and a constitution subscribed to by Masjumi together with non-Islamic parties.
The most prominent case of the transition from party politics to dakwah was the establishment of the Dewan Dakwah Islamiyah Indonesia (DDII, Indonesian Council for Islamic Propagation) in 1967 by leading figures of the former Masjumi party.
After World War II, Masjumi (Council of Indonesian Muslim Associations) emerged as the main Islamic modernist political party.
Kahin, having interviewed Osman Raliby, concluded that "it was pretty clear from what Osman said that there was not much prospect of a sufficient narrowing of the gap between the Masjumi and proponents of the Pantjasila to have arrived at a compromise" (paraphrased interview with George Kahin, 26 May 1971).