Mazovia

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Mazovia

Mazovia (məzōˈvēə) or Masovia (məsōˈ–) Pol. Mazowsze, historic region, central Poland. At the death (1138) of Boleslaus III, Mazovia became an independent duchy under the Piast dynasty. It became a suzerainty of Great Poland in 1351 and was finally united with it in 1526. Mazovia passed to Prussia during the 18th-century partitions of Poland and was later a part of the Russian Empire. It reverted to Poland in 1918.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mazovia

 

(Polish Mazowsze), a historical region of Poland, located along the middle reaches of the Vistula River and the lower courses of the Narew and Bug rivers. It took its name from a Polish tribe, the Mazovians, who settled here between the ninth and llth centuries. During the tenth century Mazovia was an independent principality. Beginning in the mid-13th century it was divided into small feudal appanages, which between the 14th and 16th centuries gradually came under the rule of the Polish kings, a process that was completed in 1526. From the 16th to the 18th century Mazovia was divided into the Rawa, Plock, and Mazowieckie województwos (provinces). The name “Mazovia” was also applied to the Mazowieckie Województwo.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Greater and Lesser Poland, as well as in Masovia, Ruthenia, and Lithuania, Latin was also more convenient and easier to understand for merchants (Bogucka & Samsonowicz 1986: 267), who had to keep records and frequently belonged to the municipal elite (Bartoszewicz 1999: 11).
TVU, representing Tees Valley, works with regional authorities from Cheshire, Saxony-Anhalt, North Rhine Westphalia, Asturias, Masovia, Estonia, Novara, Limburg, Schleswig-Holstein and Usti region.
Although they had already reached the lands of the future Polish state by the eleventh century, the earliest written mention of their settlements in Silesia, Greater Poland, and Masovia date back to the thirteenth century.
Friedrich Gross was at about the same time arrested in Warsaw (then capital of the province of Masovia, voivodeship of Poland)--indicating he was not on his way to Denmark, but probably to the imperial court in Vienna, or to the Elector of Saxony in Dresden or Leipzig.