picketing

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picketing,

act of patrolling a place of work affected by a strike in order to discourage its patronage, to make public the workers' grievances, and in some cases to prevent strikebreakers from taking the strikers' jobs. Picketing may be by individuals or by groups. It has also been used by political groups to influence legislation or to protest governmental policies. Prior to the 1930s, U.S. courts frequently ruled against the legality of strikes and picketing was frequently limited. The Norris-LaGuardia Act (1932), which severely limited the use of court injunctions to stop strikes, and subsequent legislation which guaranteed unions the right to organize, made it much easier to use pickets. The Taft-Hartley Labor Act (1947), however, outlawed mass picketing (i.e., the use of force and intimidation to prevent people from crossing picket lines) and it limited the use of pickets by outlawing secondary boycotts (i.e. using pickets against a third party that might force an employer to settle a strike). Although picketing raises a number of issues under the First Amendment right to free speech, court decisions have generally prohibited the use of vile and obscene language and of threatening gestures by the pickets.

picketing

picketing
Securing an aircraft when it is parked in the open. An aircraft may be picketed with the mooring rings that are built into the pavement. The aircraft also may be picketed to the movable and above-ground picketing blocks. These are heavy blocks made of reinforced concrete with inbuilt rings. Picketing blocks are not used for heavy aircraft. An aircraft is tied to these rings or blocks with rope or cables. Also called a tiedown. See also aircraft tiedown and mooring rings.
References in periodicals archive ?
By November, mass pickets of four hundred people added to political pressure and helped secure a first contract settlement.
To mark the end of the week of strike action, staff organised a mass picket at Network Rail's panel signal box in Newport.
Also, when the government failed to prosecute after the Oshawa injunction was challenged by a mass picket, it was denounced by many newspaper editors with articles such as "The Force of Evil" and "Downpayment on Anarchy." One editor, facing his own printers' strike, railed that injunctions were needed to protect employers "from the lawless, brutal mob scenes and direct threats to life and property engendered by otherwise uncontrollable strikers." (78) If the conservative press rather exaggerated the potential for revolution, it reflected the anger of businesses that perceived labour to be too demanding, powerful, and increasingly out of control.
In addition, the State Supreme Court granted Ohrbach's an anti-picketing injunction, allowing police to arrest those strikers who attempted to form a mass picket line and block customers' entrance to the stores.
Binmen were on a mass picket line at the Whitley depot in London Road early today and pickets were out at libraries, schools, cemeteries and Canley Crematorium.
A mass picket outside Parliament, and the presentation of a dossier to 10 Downing Street ensured that this issue will not go away.
If these demands were not met, the committee would step up its actions with mass picket lines.
Former pitmen accused the IPCC of being "not fit for purpose", and NUM activist Dave Douglass, who was at the Orgreave mass picket on that hot June day in 1984, called for a public inquiry.
As to the threat by Keith Harris to lead a mass picket of Carlton and Granada, I would say to the police, be fair but firm.
The unions decided to press ahead with the mass picket in Leamington, despite Ford's announcement on Friday that 1,500 jobs were to go at its Dagenham plant in Essex.
Transport and General Workers' Union steward Gerald Parry said: "We have had a good relationship with the police from day one, when we had a mass picket outside the factory gates.
Their bosses locked them out of the Port of Liverpool and they began a mass picket.