picketing

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Related to Mass picketing: Secondary picketing

picketing,

act of patrolling a place of work affected by a strike in order to discourage its patronage, to make public the workers' grievances, and in some cases to prevent strikebreakers from taking the strikers' jobs. Picketing may be by individuals or by groups. It has also been used by political groups to influence legislation or to protest governmental policies. Prior to the 1930s, U.S. courts frequently ruled against the legality of strikes and picketing was frequently limited. The Norris-LaGuardia Act (1932), which severely limited the use of court injunctions to stop strikes, and subsequent legislation which guaranteed unions the right to organize, made it much easier to use pickets. The Taft-Hartley Labor Act (1947), however, outlawed mass picketing (i.e., the use of force and intimidation to prevent people from crossing picket lines) and it limited the use of pickets by outlawing secondary boycotts (i.e. using pickets against a third party that might force an employer to settle a strike). Although picketing raises a number of issues under the First Amendment right to free speech, court decisions have generally prohibited the use of vile and obscene language and of threatening gestures by the pickets.

picketing

picketing
Securing an aircraft when it is parked in the open. An aircraft may be picketed with the mooring rings that are built into the pavement. The aircraft also may be picketed to the movable and above-ground picketing blocks. These are heavy blocks made of reinforced concrete with inbuilt rings. Picketing blocks are not used for heavy aircraft. An aircraft is tied to these rings or blocks with rope or cables. Also called a tiedown. See also aircraft tiedown and mooring rings.
References in periodicals archive ?
I first met Jack Dromey when he was a skilful union fixer during the bitter Grunwick dispute of the 1970s - a strike at a photo processing firm in North London which escalated into mass picketing and bloodshed - and he looked like a man going places.
A UNION leader has warned of mass picketing against any employment agency which supplies temporary workers to Asda in the event of a strike by its employees.
The days of strikes without ballots, mass picketing, closed shops and secondary action are over" (p.
The dramatic unfolding of events, particularly the mass picketing and the response of the police, is well known.
Nor did they depend upon those workers to organize the union through mass picketing and long strikes.
Palmer's contrast of the Fore River case with the Philadelphia and New York district examples effectively highlights the decisive regional differences in workers' receptiveness to union appeals, the force of determined corporate opposition, and the frustrations of taking the courts and-hearing-rooms approach to organizing (which had replaced shop militancy and mass picketing).
September 13: An injunction barring mass picketing of printing plant is issued.
8, the NLRB regional director, William Schaub, accused the unions of violating the agreement within days of its signing by blocking newspaper entrances and engaging in mass picketing.
We faced mass picketing, where striking workers blocked all entrances to our headquarters building.
Even at this point, however, it is worth remembering that as early as 1938-39 the courts ruled mass picketing and boycotts by the Future Outlook League (the militant voice of Cleveland's black community) illegal, on the ground that they were not related to formal collective bargaining.