mastaba

(redirected from Mastabas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

mastaba

(măs`təbə), in Egyptian architecture, a sepulchral structure built aboveground. The mastabas of the early dynastic period (3200–2680 B.C.), such as those of the I dynasty at Sakkara, were elaborate, having many storage or offering compartments, and were quite evidently close copies of contemporary houses. Better known are the mastabas of the Old Kingdom (2680–2181 B.C.), which were an elaboration of the predynastic burial-pit and mound form. The typical mastaba was generally rectangular in plan with a flat roof and inward-sloping walls, built of brick and faced with limestone slabs.

Mastaba

A freestanding tomb found in ancient Egypt, consisting of a rectangular superstructure with inclined sides, from which a shaft leads to underground burial chambers.

Mastaba

 

(Arabic, literally “stone bench”), the modern name for ancient Egyptian tombs of the Protodynastic Period (c. 3000-2800 B.C.) and the Old Kingdom (c. 2800-2250 B.C.). A mastaba is a rectangular superstructure with sloping sides joined by a vertical shaft to an underground burial chamber with several rooms. The outer walls of mastabas of the Protodynastic Period were built of brick (First Dynasty) or stone (Second Dynasty) and were recessed and brightly painted (exemplified by the tomb of Queen Herneit in Saqqara).

In the mastabas of the Old Kingdom, the superstructure had a severe exterior with smooth walls and a complex interior layout, with halls, corridors, and storerooms (exemplified by the tomb of the royal treasurer Akhethotep and his son Ptahhotep in Saqqara, Fifth Dynasty). The inner chambers contained statues (repositories of the souls of the dead) and the walls were covered with reliefs and paintings.

REFERENCE

Vseobshchaia istoriia arkhitektury, vol. 1. Moscow, 1970.

mastaba

mastaba
A freestanding tomb used in ancient Egypt, consisting of a rectangular superstructure with inclined sides, from which a shaft leads to underground burial and offering chambers.

mastaba

, mastabah
a mudbrick superstructure above tombs in ancient Egypt from which the pyramid developed
References in periodicals archive ?
SCA Secretary-General Zahi Hawass revealed that two weeks ago, during a routine excavation work at the mastaba of the Sixth-Dynasty lector-priest Sennedjem, their archaeologists stumbled upon a cache of mummies of the 26th Dynasty, Egypt's last independent Kingdom before it was overrun by a succession of foreign conquerors.
He had a counselor named Imhotep who supervised the building of six mastabas of stone, one on top of the other, each smaller than the one below.
The same is true for monuments from the earliest years of the Fourth Dynasty, prior to the mastabas in Snofru's necropolises at Medum and Dahshur.
While the mastaba continued as a tomb for common people, for royalty, it was replaced by the (http://www.