mastaba

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mastaba

(măs`təbə), in Egyptian architecture, a sepulchral structure built aboveground. The mastabas of the early dynastic period (3200–2680 B.C.), such as those of the I dynasty at Sakkara, were elaborate, having many storage or offering compartments, and were quite evidently close copies of contemporary houses. Better known are the mastabas of the Old Kingdom (2680–2181 B.C.), which were an elaboration of the predynastic burial-pit and mound form. The typical mastaba was generally rectangular in plan with a flat roof and inward-sloping walls, built of brick and faced with limestone slabs.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Mastaba

A freestanding tomb found in ancient Egypt, consisting of a rectangular superstructure with inclined sides, from which a shaft leads to underground burial chambers.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mastaba

 

(Arabic, literally “stone bench”), the modern name for ancient Egyptian tombs of the Protodynastic Period (c. 3000-2800 B.C.) and the Old Kingdom (c. 2800-2250 B.C.). A mastaba is a rectangular superstructure with sloping sides joined by a vertical shaft to an underground burial chamber with several rooms. The outer walls of mastabas of the Protodynastic Period were built of brick (First Dynasty) or stone (Second Dynasty) and were recessed and brightly painted (exemplified by the tomb of Queen Herneit in Saqqara).

In the mastabas of the Old Kingdom, the superstructure had a severe exterior with smooth walls and a complex interior layout, with halls, corridors, and storerooms (exemplified by the tomb of the royal treasurer Akhethotep and his son Ptahhotep in Saqqara, Fifth Dynasty). The inner chambers contained statues (repositories of the souls of the dead) and the walls were covered with reliefs and paintings.

REFERENCE

Vseobshchaia istoriia arkhitektury, vol. 1. Moscow, 1970.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastaba

mastaba
A freestanding tomb used in ancient Egypt, consisting of a rectangular superstructure with inclined sides, from which a shaft leads to underground burial and offering chambers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mastaba

, mastabah
a mudbrick superstructure above tombs in ancient Egypt from which the pyramid developed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the other potential reconstructions, she expresses a preference for options based upon the "South Tomb" of Djoser and the mastaba of Shepseskaf, which in her view provide the best fit with the creative, functional, and religious requirements of the new royal building type in Saqqara (p.
As representacoes de luta sao correntes no registro arqueologico egipcio, tanto como representacoes parietais encontradas nas mastabas do Medio Imperio de Beni Hassan quanto em modelos tridimensionais, tais como estatuetas de lutadores.
Os animais de pequeno porte eram cacados para a alimentacao, tais como os peixes cacados com arpao ou as aves; por sinal esse tipo de atividade, de acordo com as representacoes encontradas nas mastabas, parece ter sido uma atividade familiar, em que homens, mulheres e criancas passeiam de barco pelos pantanos juntos.
He revealed that the mummies, most of which had deteriorated to little more than skeletons, were found inside an 11-metre deep burial shaft excavated inside the Sennedjem mastaba.
Waadalla Abul Ela, head of the ministry's projects sector, announced that a development project that started a month ago, targets to establish a collection of concrete mastabas for the monumental blocks and stelae that were in the temple.
The same is true for monuments from the earliest years of the Fourth Dynasty, prior to the mastabas in Snofru's necropolises at Medum and Dahshur.
The Southern cemetery in Saqqara is being supported now by the full completion of the fifth and sixth mastabas, and the eastern and southern facades, Shahat pointed out.
There were ceremonies held in every mastaba, which had a large room where people would honor the spirit of of the deceased.
CAIRO -- 1 July 2018: The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is currently displaying a panel from the Mastaba of Hesy-Ra at Saqqara.