Masulipatnam

Masulipatnam:

see MachilipatnamMachilipatnam
, Masulipatnam
, or Bandar
, city (1991 pop. 159,110), Andhra Pradesh state, E central India, a port on the Bay of Bengal. In the 17th cent. it was a center of French, British, and Dutch trade.
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, India.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Masulipatnam

 

(Machilipatnam, Bandar), a city in India, located in the state of Andhra Pradesh. It is a port on the Bay of Bengal, in the Krishna delta. Population, 112,600 (1971). It is an important center for trade as well as crafts, which include the production of fabrics and jewelry. Masulipatnam has foodprocessing enterprises, and a college of Andhra University is located there.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: 6 (opposite) Prayer mat (jainamaz), Masulipatnam, mid-19th century.
But he declined the offer, and with an "ox and two servants", proceeded to the great port of Masulipatnam, hoping to arrange passage to Pegu, as orders from his superiors specified.
Various types of painted dooputty fabric and striped and checked cloths came from Pulicat, Tegenepatnam and Masulipatnam. The men wore these pieces in their entirety draped from the hips down and gathered in thick folds in front in a distinctive manner.
The skeins of yarn had to be tightly twisted and identical in colour, each weighing no more than 3/10 viss and packed in the Masulipatnam way (75 lbs to the bale).
633-633v (quantities and total prices in Dutch guilders with separate lists of goods from both Pulicat and Masulipatnam, 1637); VOC 1242, ff.
Keay is quick to ridicule those earlier historians who touted Britain's manifest destiny in India, those for whom, "If there was no master plan, there was surely a destiny at work; and the factors at Surat, Masulipatnam, and Madras were seen as living and laboring with a rugged spirit born of the conviction that one day their Clive would come".
William Methwold, who served as an agent for the English East India Company at Masulipatam (Masulipatnam) between 1618 and 1622, explained that this superiority derived from: "a plant which growth only in this country (Golconda), called by them Chay, which dyeth and stayeth a perfect red, with them in as great account as scarlet with us...", (11) and "...no other place affords the like colour".