Masuria


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Related to Masuria: Masurian Lakes, Masurians

Masuria

(məzo͝o`rēə), Ger. Masurenland, Pol. Mazury, region, N Poland. It is a low-lying area covered by large lakes and forests and drained by many small rivers. The original population of the region was expelled by the Teutonic Knights and replaced (14th cent.) with Polish settlers. Masuria later became part of East Prussia and was largely Germanized by the early 20th cent. After Masuria passed to Poland in 1945, most of the German-speaking population was expelled and replaced by Poles. The Masurian Lakes region, where more than 2,700 lakes are located, was the scene of heavy fighting early in World War I. Two Russian armies, commanded by generals Samsonov and Rennenkampf, were defeated in the region—Samsonov by Hindenburg at Tannenburg (Aug., 1914) and Rennenkampf by Mackensen in the lake country (Sept., 1914). The Russians were also repulsed (Feb., 1915) in Masuria in the so-called Winter Battle.
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Masuria

a region of NE Poland: until 1945 part of East Prussia: includes the Masurian Lakes, scene of Russian defeats by the Germans (1914, 1915) during World War I
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The situation changed in 1226, when the Prince of Masuria, Konrad, summoned the Teutonic Knights to help him in his fight against the Old Prussians.
Kruk's writings, for instance collections of poetry: Rysowane z pamiqci (Drawn out of memory 1963), Zapisy powrotu (Records of a return 1969), Moja Polnoc (My North 1977) as well as novels: Drogami o swicie (Ways at dawn 1967), Kronika z Mazur (A chronicle from Masuria 1989) make up a literary interpretation of the ideas that underlie the theoretical considerations of Karl Schlogel, presented in his book Im Raume lesen wir die Zeit.
Sitting in the north east of the country, near the Russian border, Masuria is dubbed the 'land of a thousand lakes'.
The discussed examples of the conversion of shrines may be supplemented by subsequent important sites located in such Polish geographic regions as Lower Silesia, Western Pomerania and warmia and Masuria, shrines adopted by the Orthodox and Unite populations displaced from their homeland.
He recounts in detail the war from this point of view--as well as his role as Chief of the General Staff in the Eastern Front--from August 1914 to November 1918, and details such as campaigns in Poland, Masuria, Russia, and Rumania, in addition to the conduct of war.
Friedrich Oldenberg's report, About Masuria, submitted on the eve of the United Church's Golden Anniversary, alarmed anxious officials in Berlin because it reinforced their suspicions about Catholicism.
Uno corresponde a Masuria, una region polaca que a lo largo de su historia ha ido cambiando de adscripcion estatal y de poblacion.
The proband was a 15-year-old female patient from Masuria in the northern part of Poland who had been suffering from photosensitivity since early childhood.
Sonja, with her ambivalent sexuality, uniform, and national identity, can also be seen as a projection of the confusion of German identities in the narrator, with his memories of Masuria and Weimar Berlin and his current 'Bundesburger' status.
He also was Visiting Professor at the University of Szczecin (PL), University of Warmia and Masuria at Olsztyn (PL) and University of Hankuk at Seoul.