Matthiessen's rule

Matthiessen's rule

An empirical rule which states that the total resistivity of a crystalline metallic specimen is the sum of the resistivity due to thermal agitation of the metal ions of the lattice and the resistivity due to the presence of imperfections in the crystal. This rule is a basis for understanding the resistivity behavior of metals and alloys at low temperatures.

The resistivity of a metal results from the scattering of conduction electrons. Lattice vibrations scatter electrons because the vibrations distort the crystal. Imperfections such as impurity atoms, interstitials, dislocations, and grain boundaries scatter conduction electrons because in their immediate vicinity the electrostatic potential differs from that of the perfect crystal.

Matthiessen's rule

[′math·ə·sənz ‚rül]
(solid-state physics)
An empirical rule which states that the total resistivity of a crystalline metallic specimen is the sum of the resistivity due to thermal agitation of the metal ions of the lattice and the resistivity due to imperfections in the crystal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Standard SMRTA scheme treats the N process and U process as two independent scattering events and use Matthiessen's rule to account for the total relaxation time 1/[[tau].sup.0.sub.[lambda]] = 1/[[tau].sup.(N).sub.[lambda]] + 1 /[[tau].sup.(U).sub,[lambda]], where [[tau].sup.(N,U).sub.[lambda]] is defined as [[tau].sujp.(N,U).sub.[lambda]] = 1/[[GAMMA].sup.(N,U).sub.[lambda]].
Pearsall, "Failure of Matthiessen's rule in the calculation of carrier mobility and alloy scattering effects in Ga0.47In0.53As," Electronics Letters, vol.
As shown in Figures 1(a) and 1(b), the theoretical [mu] is limited by the various scattering mechanisms, such as piezoelectric, acoustic-mode deformation potential, and polar optical phonon, assuming that Matthiessen's rule [3] is applied.