Maunder minimum


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Maunder minimum

(mawn -der) See sunspot cycle.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

maunder minimum

[′mȯn·dər ′min·ə·məm]
(astronomy)
A period of time from about 1650 to 1710 when the sun did not appear to have sunspots.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The team then took the model back in time, retracing the Maunder Minimum. With only the records of sparse sunspots as input, the model postdicted what the Sun and the solar wind would have looked like, reconstructing the space weather of 400 years ago.
"We didn't go looking for the Maunder Minimum; it just popped out of the data," says study coauthor Valerie Trouet, a paleoclimate scientist at the University of Arizona in Tucson.
(1) Als Maunder Minimum wird eine Periode stark verringerter Sonnenfleckenaktivitat in den Jahren zwischen 1645 und 1715 bezeichnet.
London, Jan 19 ( ANI ): Scientists have warned that the recent lack of activity in sun could lead to a new mini ice age, just like 17th century's Maunder Minimum, in European countries.
The Dalton minimum (1795-1830), the Maunder minimum (1635-1705), and the Sporer minimum (1450-1550) happened when the Sun was quite different from now (e.g., [5]).
There is a precedent; sunspots disappeared almost completely from 1645 to 1715, an event called the Maunder Minimum. So if you don't start viewing sunspots now, you might be losing your last chance!
Not to forget the Maunder Minimum AD 1645-1715 which produced the Little Ice Age, and the Solar Storm of AD 1859...a similar storm today would shut down satellites and knock out electricity grid networks!
The Maunder Minimum is considered to extend between 1645 and 1715.
There was a period from 1645 to 1715 when the sun showed similar lack of sunspots, this was the Maunder minimum when trees stopped growing and the River Thames froze.
History shows, for example, that very few sunspots were observed from 1650 to 1700, a period known as the Maunder Minimum when Europe endured particularly bitter winters.
Sceptics have drawn this conclusion because scientists have discovered a correlation between a period of low solar activity known as the Maunder Minimum (from the late-seventeenth into the eighteenth century) and low sunspot activity.
During the 17th century, which was an unusually cold period on Earth, the sun had very little magnetic activity for about a century - the Maunder Minimum, coincident with the Little Ice Age.