Maurice


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Maurice

, Byzantine emperor
Maurice (môrˈĭs), c.539–602, Byzantine emperor (582–602). He was a successful general when, on his deathbed, Tiberius II, his father-in-law and the successor of Justin II, proclaimed him emperor. He failed to halt the Lombards in Italy but ended (591) the war with Persia, restored Khosru II to the throne, and defeated the Avars. His strict discipline caused mutiny in the Danubian army, and he was obliged to flee. He was killed by order of the usurper Phocas, who was deposed (610), in turn, by Heraclius.

Maurice

, duke and elector of Saxony
Maurice, 1521–53, duke (1541–47) and elector (1547–53) of Saxony. A member of the Albertine branch of the ruling house of Saxony, he became duke of Albertine Saxony during the Protestant Reformation. Although a Protestant, he was more swayed by political than by religious motives. In 1546 he made an agreement with Holy Roman Emperor Charles V by which he was to receive, in return for deserting the Protestants of the Schmalkaldic League, the lands and title of his cousin, Elector John Frederick I of Saxony, ruler of the Ernestine portion of Saxony. He fought for Charles in the Schmalkaldic War and after the battle of Mühlberg (1547) received the electorate and a portion of his cousin's lands. However, Maurice's disgust with the emperor's ill-treatment of the Protestant leader Philip of Hesse, and his still unsatisfied ambition, led him to turn against Charles. After raising an army for the execution of the ban against Magdeburg, with which he had been entrusted, he formed an alliance with Henry II of France (1551). In the war that followed Maurice nearly captured Charles at Innsbruck. He forced Charles to free Philip and to conclude (1552) the Treaty of Passau. In 1553, Maurice was killed in a battle against Albert Alcibiades of Brandenburg-Kulmbach.
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Maurice

1. 1521--53, duke of Saxony (1541--53) and elector of Saxony (1547--53). He was instrumental in gaining recognition of Protestantism in Germany
2. known as Maurice of Nassau. 1567--1625, prince of Orange and count of Nassau; the son of William the Silent, after whose death he led the United Provinces of the Netherlands in their struggle for independence from Spain (achieved by 1609)
3. Frederick Denison. 1805--72, English Anglican theologian and pioneer of Christian socialism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
But I must never quite forget Katie Maurice and Violetta.
Barry hear you talking about your Katie Maurices and your Violettas or she'll think you tell stories."
Harrison, "I don't see why MAURICE LENNOX didn't get her.
"MAURICE LENNOX was the villain," said Anne indignantly.
"AVERIL couldn't have married MAURICE. He was bad."
Maurice Huret in his famous article gave an outline of Charles Strickland's life which was well calculated to whet the appetites of the inquiring.
"It was Maurice Fielding, of course, that your mother was engaged to," said Helen's voice.
Maurice Blum started out as an anarchist of principle, a father of the poor; he ended a greasy spy and tale-bearer that both sides used and despised.
The contest embraced within its compass not only theological doctrines, but political principles, and Maurice and Barnevelt were the temporal leaders of the same rival factions, of which Episcopius and Polyander were the ecclesiastical champions.
Maurice "Mossie" Keane passed away in the Heather Care Home of Cork's Orthopedic Hospital on Wednesday.