Maurists

Maurists

 

Congregation of St. Maur, a congregation of French Benedictine monks. It was founded in 1618 (with the abbey of St. Germain-des-Pres in Paris as its center).

The Maurists played a prominent role in collecting and publishing Western European medieval manuscripts. Acting within the general framework of the Counter-Reformation, they set themselves the task of defending the authority of the Catholic Church (in particular, the Benedictine Order itself) from criticism by Protestants. Basing their work on a massive amount of manuscript material, they published a history of the Benedictine Order, multivolume histories of individual French provinces (such as Languedoc and Brittany), and a history of French literature (more than 40 volumes). They worked out principles for establishing the authenticity of the place and time of a document’s origins and laid the foundation for paleography, diplomatics, and other auxiliary historical disciplines. J. Mabillon and B. de Montfaucon were the most prominent Maurists. The Congregation was abolished in 1790.

References in periodicals archive ?
Johannes van Oort, "John Calvin and the Church Fathers," in The Reception of the Church Fathers in the West: From the Carolingians to the Maurists, ed.
The attempts of Mabillon and the Maurists to construct a linear and secure system of graphic forms and thus to make palaeography into the first of the historical sciences; 2.
Only with manuals written by Robert Bellarmine and Antonio Possevino do historical concerns clearly win out over sectarian ones, pointing the way to a truly authentic historical method as later defined by Jean Mabillon and practiced by other Maurists.
3 (1979): 52-3; and Mark Vessey, "English Translations of the Latin Fathers, 1517-1611," The Reception of the Church Fathers in the West: From the Carolingians to the Maurists, ed.