Maurya

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Maurya

(mou`əryə), ancient Indian dynasty, c.325–c.183 B.C., founded by ChandraguptaChandragupta
(Chandragupta Maurya) , fl. c.321 B.C.–c.298 B.C., Indian emperor, founder of the Maurya dynasty and grandfather of Aśoka. He conquered the Magadha kingdom (in modern Bihar and Jharkhand) and eventually controlled all India N of the Vindhya Hills. In c.
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 (Chandragupta Maurya). He conquered the Magadha kingdom and established his capital at Pataliputra (now Patna). His son, Bindusara (d. c.273), and his grandson, AśokaAśoka
or Ashoka,
d. c.232 B.C., Indian emperor (c.273–c.232 B.C.) of the Maurya dynasty; grandson of Chandragupta. One of the greatest rulers of ancient India, he brought nearly all India, together with Baluchistan and Afghanistan, under one sway for the
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, the most notable ruler of ancient India, for the first time in history brought nearly all India, together with Afghanistan, under one rule. The culture of the Mauryan empire represents the first great flowering of Indian civilization, not to be equaled until the coming of the Gupta dynasty.

Maurya

 

a dynasty of the kings of Magadha from the fourth through the second centuries B.C.; the name of the largest state formation in the history of ancient India.

Candragupta Maurya (ruled 317-293 B.C.), the founder of the dynasty, united northwestern India and eastern Afghanistan with Magadha. Bindusara (ruled 293-268 B.C.) apparently widened the borders of the Mauryan empire in Deccan. The Mauryan empire achieved its greatest power under Asoka (ruled 268-232 B.C.), who conquered the state of Kalinga and attempted to centralize state government. During Asoka’s reign, cultural and economic ties with the outside world increased considerably.

At the end of the third century B.C., the Mauryan empire began to decline. In 180 B.C., Brhadratha, the last Mauryan emperor, was overthrown and killed by his commander in chief Pusyamitra, who founded the Sunga dynasty. Dates of Maurya rule are based on the latest research.

G. F. IL’IN

Maurya

mother loses six sons in the sea. [Br. Lit.: Riders to the Sea]
See: Despair
References in periodicals archive ?
930-1262) India Mauryan Empire (326 BC-180 BC) Tamil kingdoms (fourth century BC-fifth century AD) Bengal (fifth century BC-sixth century AD) Indonesia Early Indianized Kingdoms (first century AD-1377 AD, end of Srivijaya) Iran Achaemenid Empire (550 BC-330 BC) Iraq Assyria, Mesopotamia (c.
283 BCE), an Indian Brahmin teacher, philosopher and royal advisor to the Maurya dynasty (322-297 BCE), who is also historically credited for the founding of the Mauryan empire.
McClish, "Is the Arthasastra a Mauryan Document?" in Reimagining Asoka: Memory and History, ed.
Rekha Saxena goes on to discuss in detail about the history of Delhi from Mauryan period till 1912 when British government had transferred the national capital of India from Calcutta to Delhi.
The 2015 reading list included an Ancient Egyptian Tale of Two Brothers, (13) a Greco-Roman Cinderella tale set in Ancient Egypt, (14) Buddhist folk tales from the Mauryan (Indian) Empire, (15) a Roman Beauty and the Beast tale, (16) Chinese Cinderella tales from the Tang and Song dynasties, (17) Islamic tales from the Abbasid Empire, (18) a Swahili One-Handed Maiden tale.
Kosmin treats the Seleucid Empire thematically, dividing his study into four sections: "Border," "Homeland," "Movement," and "Colony." Under "Border," he focuses on the East, and his examination of Seleucid relations with the Mauryan Empire in India is particularly welcome.
Mauryan Empire was a major Empire the sub-continent has seen.
His clarification that the statement was with reference to history, holds no grounds because since ancient times, the land now called Afghanistan has been part of Mauryan, Kushan, Mangol, Persian, Greek, Taimur and Mughal empires, it was noted.
These include a priceless bronze idol of Lord Ganesha removed from a temple in Tamil Nadu, a statue from the Chola period and a Mauryan dynasty statue.
It was built to enshrine the redistributed holy relics of the Buddha by the famous Mauryan king Asoka the great who was also known as Dharmaraja for his services to Buddhism.
One of the four key Buddhist pilgrimage sites, as acknowledged by the Buddha himself, it was traditionally thought that the earliest archaeological evidence of Buddhist structures at Lumbini dated no earlier than the Third Century BC, linked to the patronage of the Mauryan Emperor Asoka and associated with his pillar inscription that identified the site as the birthplace of the Buddha.
Think, Morris suggests, of the Roman Empire, Han China, Mauryan India or the nations of 18th-century Europe.