Mausolus

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Mausolus

(môsō`ləs), d. 353 B.C., Persian satrap, ruler over CariaCaria
, ancient region of SW Asia Minor, S of the Maeander River, which separated it from Lydia. The territory is in present SW Asian Turkey. The Carians were probably a native people, but their region was settled by both Dorian and Ionian colonists.
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 (c.376–353 B.C.). He was always more or less independent. One of the satraps who revolted against Artaxerxes IIArtaxerxes II,
d. 358 B.C., king of ancient Persia (404–358 B.C.), son and successor of Darius II. He is sometimes called in Greek Artaxerxes Mnemon [the thoughtful]. Early in his reign Cyrus the Younger attempted to assassinate him and seize the throne.
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, he later allied himself with the Persian kings. He extended his power greatly, even to hegemony over Rhodes. After his death his wife, Artemisia, erected at Halicarnassus a tomb that he had planned, called the mausoleummausoleum
, a sepulchral structure or tomb, especially one of some size and architectural pretension, so called from the sepulcher of that name at Halicarnassus, Asia Minor, erected (c.352 B.C.) in memory of Mausolus of Caria.
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Mausolus

 

a Hellenistic ruler in Asia Minor from 377/76 to 353/52 B.C. He was called a Persian satrap, but in reality he was independent of Persian rule.

Mausolus’ territory consisted of the district of Caria, part of the territory of Lycia, the city of Heraclea in Latmos, the city of lasos, and part of Lydia. His rule in fact included the islands of Rhodes, Cos, and Chios, with whom Mausolus concluded a treaty of alliance. In the 460’s B.C., Mausolus moved the capital of his state to Halicarnassus, where he built many palaces and temples. The great Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (the tomb of Mausolus), erected after his death on the instructions of his wife, Aŕtemisia, was considered in antiquity to be one of the seven wonders of the world.

REFERENCE

Buscher, E. Mausollus und Alexander. Berlin, 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) Dating back to the 4th century BC, Mausoleion the tomb of Caria's famous King Mausolos of Halicarnassus, is among the seven wonders of the world.
His son King Mausolos had moved the Kayra Policy Center to Bodrum from Milas.
Completed in 1915, the building is a copy of the Mausoleum of the Mausolos, based in present-day Turkey and one of the ancient Seven Wonders of the World.
In troth, little remains of the resting place of King Mausolos; earthquakes have damaged it, the Knights of St John stripped it of its sumptuous friezes to decorate their nearby harbour castle, and 19th-century treasure hunters carted off much of what remained to the British Museum.
"I have seen the walls and hanging gardens of ancient Babylon, the statue of Olympian Zeus, the Colossus of Rhodes, the mighty work of the high Pyramids and the tomb of Mausolos," he wrote.
Fortunately a good deal survives of the fifth Wonder: the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, the tomb of one Mausolos, hence the name.
Mausolos died in about 353 BC and his wife Artemisia who succeeded him had the massive tomb built slap in the middle of his capital, Halicarnassus, now the delightful seaside resort of Bodron.
The Greek sculptors studded this with a mass of colossal statues, including one of Mausolos himself.
Its lack of modesty is perhaps summed up in the colossal statue of a chieftain who is surely Mausolos himself.
The magnificent monument to Mausolos was destroyed by earthquake at some point in late antiquity and literally became a quarry.
The Greeks surely regarded the tomb of Mausolos as an example of arrogance, their cardinal sin.