Mawworm


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Mawworm

sanctimonious preacher. [Br. Lit.: The Hypocrite, Brewer Handbook, 687]
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(31) These lines echo the sermon inserted by comic actor Charles Mathews in performing The Hypocrite at the Lyceum in 1809, which thereafter became a traditional part of the play when either Mathews or John Liston played the role of Mawworm (Davis 'Cannibalisation'; see also Mathews 150).
4, 1838, and located in the Harvard Theatre Collection, Rice inveighed against Northerners, whom he called "God-damn fanatical Mawworms," and declared that "cotton has taken a rise and the South will flourish forever." The evidence is not entirely conclusive, but it suggests that Rice was unlikely a passive bystander during the coming war.
George Fitzhugh took satisfaction in tracing New Englanders back to the "cold and marshy regions" of Britain, where, he pointed out, "man is little more than a natural, cold-blooded, amphibious biped." A writer in 1863 was similarly disparaging of the first New England settlers, which he termed a mass of "Saxonized mawworms," that had been "vomited from the piety-gorged stomach of Britain" and would eventually meet their end through collective suicide, just as "the Java reptile" expired through "the excess of its own poison." President Jefferson Davis himself echoed such language late in 1862, speaking before the Mississippi legislature about the basic incompatibility of the two sections.