Maxwell's electromagnetic theory

Maxwell's electromagnetic theory

[′mak‚swelz i‚lek·trō·mag′ned·ik ′thē·ə·rē]
(electromagnetism)
A mathematical theory of electric and magnetic fields which predicts the propagation of electromagnetic radiation, and is valid for electromagnetic phenomena where effects on an atomic scale can be neglected.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, Maxwell's Electromagnetic theory has been equally important in the development of a host of other engineering applications.
The expansion of Maxwell's electromagnetic theory of light by Heinrich Hertz in 1886 starts our timeline.
Maxwell's electromagnetic theory entailed a new prediction: the equality of the light speed in vacuum with the ratio of the electrostatic to the electromagnetic units.